by Maria Popova

"Good writing isn't a science. It's an art, and the horizon is infinite. You can always get better."

In late 1999, David Foster Wallace - poignant contemplator of death and redemption, tragic prophet of the meaning of life, champion of intelligent entertainment, admonisher against blind ambition, advocate of true leadership - called the office of the prolific writer-about-writing Bryan A. Garner and, declining to be put through to Garner himself, grilled his secretary about her boss. Wallace was working on an extensive essay about Garner's work and his newly released Dictionary of Modern American Usage. A few weeks later, Garner received a hefty package in the mail - the manuscript of Wallace's essay, titled "Tense Present," which was famously rejected by The New Republic and The New York Review of Books, then finally published by Harper's and included in the 2005 anthology Consider the Lobster and Other Essays. Garner later wrote of the review, "a long, laudatory piece": "It changed my literary life in ways that a book review rarely can."

Over the course of the exchange, the two struck up a friendship and began an ongoing correspondence, culminating in Garner's extensive interview with Wallace, conducted on February 3, 2006, in Los Angeles - the kind of conversation that reveals as much about its subject matter, in this case writing and language, as it does about the inner workings of its subject's psyche. Five years after Wallace's death, their conversation was published in Quack This Way: David Foster Wallace & Bryan A. Garner Talk Language and Writing (public library). ...[Continue reading on Brain Pickings]