For centuries mankind has searched for the Fountain of Youth; that proverbial source of everlasting life. Herodotus wrote of a spring that gave the water of youth to all who bathed in it. Juan Ponce de Leon looked for it in south Florida centuries later, but didn't find it. Man's quest for such a fountain failed until Dr. Vladimir Khavinson discovered Epitalon in the 1980's. The fountain turned out to be a peptide produced by the pineal gland .

There are many theories of aging, one of which is the shortening of telomeres in our DNA. A is like the plastic tip on the end of your shoe lace. It protects the DNA from unraveling during each cell division. Each cell division results in a slightly shorter telomere length, and eventually, the cell can no longer divide. This is called the Hayflick Limit, after Dr. Leonard Hayflick's discovery that cells have a limited number of times that they can divide. In mammals, the telomeres are protected from shortening until the onset of sexual maturity. After that, they begin to shorten with each cell division, eventually leading to an inability to divide any more in order to replace worn out, damaged or diseased cells. There is an enzyme called telomerase that is produced in the cells which stimulates the lengthening of the telomeres. The pineal gland produces a hormone called epithalamin that tells the cells to produce telomerase which in turn results in longer telomeres in our DNA. The functionality of the pineal gland declines with age, and is partly responsible for age related diseases. What Dr. Khavinson found was that introducing epithalamin into mammals resulted in a reversal of age related diseases, and a reversal of the signs of aging. He was able to take geriatric female mice, who were no longer fertile, give them epithalamin, and after about two weeks of treatment, the mice became fertile again, got pregnant and had pups. He showed that Epitalon induces telomerase activity in human somatic cells, proving that telomeres were lengthened by the peptide. The synthetic version of epithalamin was patented by Dr. Khavinson and called "Epitalon" (also sometimes called epithalon since the original word is in Russian). It was approved for general use in the Soviet Union in 1990 and has been used in gerontology there ever since. No adverse side effects have ever been reported, according to Dr. Khavinson. ...[Continue reading on Nootropix]