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Garrett Payne 1

@gpayne44
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  • 2017-04-03 @ 10:31:21

    Thanks for sharing this! My situation is similar to yours; I started practicing yoga about 5 months ago to heal a herniated disk in my lower back. For many months after my injury happened a year ago everything I did was very painful, especially going from standing to sitting due to the sciatica. Even something as basic as trying to touch my toes was not possible without serious pain. All of the muscles from my left lower back all the way down to the toes of my left foot were constantly flexed from the pressure my disk put on the nerve column controlling them. None of the advice or drugs my doctors could give me helped in any way. But now after I decided to try a yoga practice, my flexibility is returning to a normal level and my pain levels have drastically decreased. I am also 23 years old and I love to be active, but this injury really scared me; I thought I might never be able to run, bike, or skate ever again. Practicing yoga changed all of that and I am now making significant progress in my recovery.

    I am definitely going to check out your book recommendations to learn more about yogic philosophy and how I can incorporate my practice into my daily life. Thanks again!

    The Ultimate Beginner’s Guide to Yoga

  • 2017-01-30 @ 13:54:01

    I don’t think LSD could ever ‘turn its back’ on the psychedelic revolution, but the people who use it certainly can. As you stated, the fate of the psychedelic revolution is in our hands as pioneers and advocates for safe, responsible use. Scientific research is very far removed from the everyday experience of most people who use LSD; we should certainly support its continued development but the most important thing for the movement now is for psychonauts to exist as prime examples of the benefits of responsible, intentional use in their everyday lives. We should be as open as possible about psychedelic experiences with those that we associate with so that more people can understand how they can benefit from psychedelic experiences should they choose to have one.

    I don’t think that the popularity of microdosing vs. macrodosing has any relevance to the fate of the psychedelic movement. Psychedelics do not have any a priori intended purpose, so the movement should respond to the needs and desires of the users and public instead of our use conforming to the original intention of the psychedelic movement. What is most important now is for our generation of psychonauts to essentially clear our collective name from the mistakes of our forebears. We need to erase the public image of an average LSD user as a burnt-out hippie and replace it with the reality that any type of person can use and benefit from LSD in the right set and setting. Science will progress at its own pace; we can be much more effective as individuals by trying to shift psychedelic culture from a wild party scene to a disciplined and mindful dojo for self-exploration. Then, the scientific effort will benefit as well from the public’s updated perspective on psychedelia in general.

    The Micro-Dose vs. The Mystical Experience: Has LSD Turned its Back on the Psychedelic Revolution?

  • 2016-05-05 @ 10:53:58

    This video was so great, thanks for sharing! I really enjoyed the part where he talked about changing terminology between dogmatic systems. I see so much of that happening among “spiritual” (whatever that word means) people that I know and its funny to see him point out how common that has become.

    We all get trapped by our egos from time to time, but the important thing is that we accept that we are imperfect by nature and that we have the chance to improve with every waking moment. Anything can be “spiritual” and contribute to one’s growth if it is viewed from a growth mindset. I certainly saw some of my old habits coming up in this video, which only further motivates me to refine my spiritual practice and ensure that it is as genuine as it can be.

    How to be Ultra Spiritual: Hilarious Video Satirizes Shadow Tendencies of “Spiritual” People

  • 2016-02-05 @ 14:49:55

    Excellent article, Felix. I have done a lot of thinking on this topic applied to other psychedelic substances as well, specifically LSD, mushrooms, MDMA, ketamine, and cannabis (because those are the ones with which I am personally experienced).

    I think that the “shortcut” offered by psychedelic experiences has significantly hindered the rate at which humanity progresses spiritually. Many people that I know (and many others whom I do not know) take psychedelics, make valuable inferences and insights into their existential condition during the experience, but then never take the time to properly reflect on them and integrate them into their mode of living. Like you stated, the mundane world is the real test of one’s spirit and being, but that is being lost in our culture. Psychedelics cannot do our work for us; they can only help us direct our energy to where it is meant to be. I feel that it is our duty as agents of human advancement to encourage others to fully embrace the path of spiritual growth before them, no matter how difficult or unpleasant it may seem.

    The Joys and Pains of Visionary Medicine: Why the Ceremony of Life Comes Before the Ayahuasca Ceremony

  • 2015-10-29 @ 10:16:55

    This is exactly what I needed to see today. I’m liking the quotes on the front page with the new format, keep them coming!

  • 2015-09-22 @ 17:52:31

    As an undergraduate physics student, this comic is very relatable. Academia needs a fundamental reshaping of its inherent attitudes if we are to derive the maximum benefit from its nearly limitless potential.

    Is academia really a place for freethinking?

  • 2015-04-29 @ 09:34:31

    I think that providing a list of topics that are strictly “pseudoscience” is foolish and intellectually immature. Not all things labeled as pseudoscience are outside the scope of real science; these topics simply have not yet been given the scientific rigor they so deserve. For example, imagine if Michael Faraday had given in to the notion that electromagnetic induction was “pseudoscience.” If he had, our society would have had to wait even longer for the development of electronics of all kinds. People should define what is pseudoscience and what is not based on the quality of the argument and evidence at hand instead of the subject matter the investigator is presenting. All scientific discoveries and revelations that have ever occurred started off as pseudoscience in the minds of the masses, and labeling topics as strictly pseudoscience only delays our understanding of what may be meaningful experiential phenomena.

    What Is Pseudoscience? And How Not To Be Fooled

  • 2015-04-21 @ 13:27:32

    I appreciate you posting this. Many young Americans, such as you and I, are waking up to the real nature of American culture and I believe that with time and focused intention we can make a real difference within ourselves and our global community.

    How it Feels to be a Young American in 2014 (Or, How America Fails Us)

  • 2015-04-14 @ 18:38:29

    I wish more people thought this way. Instead of seeking pleasure and escape from harsh realities, we should embrace them head on. Life is a test of how well one reacts to these unfortunate, but completely real truths.

    6 Harsh Truths That Will Make You a Better Person

  • 2015-01-27 @ 11:06:16

    This study happened at my university! It’s great to see academia changing its perspective on psychedelic medicine.

    Day Tripping: Benefits Seen in Psychedelics

  • 2015-01-13 @ 14:31:14

    Thanks for posting, this was awesome! I share many of his views on science and spirituality.

    Science Saved My Soul.