2 Real Life Insights From Lucid Dreaming

Eric (@blankey) 8 years ago

A few years ago I heard about lucid dreaming through the internet. It sparked my interest so I began practicing certain techniques so that I could achieve this state. After a few months of regularly reality checking and starting a dream journal, I began lucid dreaming pretty regularly and still am today. I have flown into space, talked to dream characters, left my body, flown through black holes, and the list goes on. Of course, this all takes place within the dream realm, but I have gained a few main insights into the waking world as well.

1) There is absolutely zero difference between the dreaming world’s structure and the waking world’s structure.

After a year or so of lucid dreaming I began to get bored of flying and the works, so I would instead sit and meditate (which feels amazing). Eventually I would look around at my surroundings more just to see how real it all looked. I remember one time specifically I became lucid outside my parents front door. I got on the ground and got right up to the cement. I felt it and examined it from every angle. I then woke up, walked outside, and did the very same thing while awake. There was literally no difference; there is no difference. Of course, this can vary if you are dreaming and enter another dimension or something of the sort (which I have), then sure, it may not be the same as the waking world.

2) There is always a story going on in both the waking world and the dream world. It is your conscious choice to go along with it or “wake up” and enter “creation mode”.

When you wake up or become lucid in your dream, you have two choices. Either you choose to leave the scenario put in place and enter “creation mode” (do whatever you want) or you can go along with the act. In fact, a lot of the time you will get lost in the act and forget once again that you are indeed dreaming. This is partly why lucid dreaming is so difficult. The act that you give yourself (both in your dream and the repetitive cyclical thought patterns within your mind during waking life) is incredibly convincing. You were born into a set of rules, a game, an act, really. Whatever system you were born into, whether it is monetary, political, religious, or any type of ideology, it is your choice whether or not you join the act or leave it once and for all and start your own story. Life is limitless. You can choose to leave the stage anytime you want. Begin your own journey. What better time and when other time than now.
“All the worlds a stage, and all the men and women merely players. They have their exits and entrances, and one man in his time plays many parts…”
William Shakespeare

This article and more can be found at: http://ericsglobalconnection.blogspot.com

November 19, 2013 at 7:04 pm
Mike Wuest (510) (@mikeyw829) 8 years ago ago

@blankey, cool post and blog. What helped you the most in learning to lucid dream?

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Anonymous (0) (@) 8 years ago ago

Sounds pretty cool.

If you practice a talent in dream world you think your gained skill will translate in reality well?

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Eric (1,819)M (@blankey) 8 years ago ago

@mikeyw829, I would say just getting really interested in dreaming in general. Start talking about the dreams you have with everyone and keep reality checking throughout the day. I wrote another article on what has helped me lucid dream throughout the years here: http://ericsglobalconnection.blogspot.com/2013/10/5-easy-steps-to-lucid-dreaming-and.html

@grandkintaro777, Somewhat. When you imagine or visualize something your brain signals the same way as if you were actually performing the act. So sure it could help your brain get wired around it and it indeed has been proven to help to visualize things (dreaming included), but practicing and performing skills in physical reality will be the only sure way to gain skill. So do both :)

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Anonymous (21) (@) 8 years ago ago

@blankey,

Quick off tangent story about lucid dreaming, but several years ago I practiced and got really good at lucid dreaming. Reliably was able to initiate, be aware I was in a dream, and control things. Night after night I’d lucid dream. Then one night I got all sinister for no good reason. It scares me to even reflect on what deep crevice of my soul that came from, but for instance, in my dream, I purposely drove my car up on to a sidewalk filled with people at a high speed and killed many of them gruesomely. Forced people to do stuff against their will. Etc. When I woke up I had a huge crisis of consciousness and guilt. It was stuff I would NEVER do in the ‘real world’. I am not sure what made me feel so omnipotent and without morals. I immediately stopped lucid dreaming. To this day I ponder the parallels of our existence. To some alternate reality I dreamt up, I am a scornful and evil creator, who inflicted senseless evil on my creation and then abruptly disappeared and cut off all communication. I wonder if they teach about me in their sunday schools and churches as some sort of vengeful god. Am I?

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Eric (1,819)M (@blankey) 8 years ago ago

@arenotlost, I don’t think the dream realm is linear or has any recollection. Only you do because you are all of it. Everything or everyone you killed is all a figment of your imagination. It’s literally just like playing Grand Theft Auto and getting 5 stars. It doesn’t matter.. you were just a person bored and decided to have fun.

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Anonymous (21) (@) 8 years ago ago

@blankey, I wonder if they are saying the same thing about us. So does that give me free reign to go back and raise Cain again? I hope not. That shit scared me. Still flying through the cosmos was pretty spectacular. I miss it. Peace.

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Anonymous (0) (@) 8 years ago ago

So many years I’ve spent reading about lucid dreaming, I know every technique .. been to every LD forum there is, read all of experiences, good LD’s, bad LD’s .. but never really had succes falling into LD. Why? Because I’m too lazy. Writing a dream journal? I have about 10 dreams per night, and the second I wake up and think of writing in my journal, I’m like ”fuck it, I’ll remember it anyway”. That happened hundreds of times, and of course I don’t remember a thing. I did experience LD by accident, though. And it was epic, but it was semi-lucid dream(s) or something like that, where I’m aware of my dream, but can barely control it. I just wish I wasn’t so lazy .. I tried recording my voice in the morning, but I was too tired for that too. But dream journal is probably the key to LD, because it’s easier to create your own reality check .. I think FILD is the best technique because you don’t have to go trough sleep paralysis, at least I think so.

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Anonymous (21) (@) 8 years ago ago

@hesher,

I didn’t really read much about how to LD. I just kind of started wondering about it when I was pretty young. At first I just started really trying to visualize myself flying when I was trying to fall alseep. I kept visualizing flying over a pool so that when I fell initially I wouldn’t get hurt and wake up. After a while I sort of had the vague sense I was dreaming but it was hard to tell and I wasn’t in control. Then I realized that I was watching myself 3rd person (like from a distance outside my body). Then I started visualizing I was flying as I was trying to fall asleep but I’d put myself into my body (1st person) and was looking out of my own eyes. I think this linked my consciousness and it was full on lucid dreaming almost every night from then on. I stopped doing it for the reason I posted above. But a few weeks ago I just found myself one night back in flying mode and lucid without trying just before I woke up. It made me really confused and for a short while after I woke up I thought I could fly in this reality as well. I even woke up my girlfriend and asked her in all seriousness if I could fly. Luckily I didn’t attempt to test it out in any way and it wore off a few minutes later.

Off topic, does anyone know the nuerochemical or mechanism that erases our memories of dreams after we wake up? I’ve often wondered if that had been identified.

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Eric (1,819)M (@blankey) 8 years ago ago

@arenotlost, When I was a kid I feel like I did it quite a bit but never released I did. I actually used to be able to go straight from bed to weird visualizations to then popping up into a very hazy dream. I would always imagine girls I had crushes on haha.

And no idea on that. That would be interesting to find out.

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Bianca A (101) (@biancavila) 8 years ago ago

Incredible. Blows my mind. I’ve been diagnosed with narcolepsy, and sometimes it feels like I’m lucid dreaming, but only during times when I’m “awake,” and there’s absolute nothingness when I’m asleep.

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Bianca A (101) (@biancavila) 8 years ago ago

@blankey @arenotlost
and the reason why I mention that is because I was wondering if you guys would be able to explain what’s happening with my consciousness

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Eric (1,819)M (@blankey) 8 years ago ago

@biancavila, I think you can only answer that.

But it does sound interested so I will ask some questions. So are you saying when you are awake in real life, you feel like you are lucid dreaming? And when you sleep everything is blank? Or did I interpret that wrong? I’m not too familiar with narcolepsy either.

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Bianca A (101) (@biancavila) 8 years ago ago

@blankey, I think that’s the final step, yes, but having absolutely no experience with trying to control my dreams, I don’t know how to go about this at all ):

Yes, that’s correct. But it’s only sometimes when I’m awake that I feel as if I’m in a lucid dream, not always. When I sleep, it’s like I disappear from existence. Right now, I don’t want to say anything more than answering the questions you ask me because I’m scared I’ll give false information since I can only truly answer the more difficult questions when I am in the state about which the question is asking.

Thank you for your interest and help. My hope is that my understanding others will also benefit by gaining insight about the connectivity between a conscious state and an unconscious state. I hope I’m not coming across as selfish!

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LVX (297) (@Vovinawol) 8 years ago ago

@biancavila, It sounds like an awakening process is going on with you.

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Bianca A (101) (@biancavila) 8 years ago ago

@vovinawol, hm, what type of awakening? where do you see this awakening resulting in?
I’ve never thought of that before. Thank you.

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LVX (297) (@Vovinawol) 8 years ago ago

@biancavila, The things we don’t see, are the things right in front of us. It’s like not seeing the forest for all the trees in the way.

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LOFF (2) (@LOFF) 8 years ago ago

@blankey i meditate daily and have been incredibly interested in lucid dreaming for a few months. I used to drink alchohol heavily and as a result seemed to have damaged my memory. The memory damage seems to have bled over into my dream life as well as i haven’t remembered a dream of mine in over 7 months…would you possibly have any suggestions?

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Anonymous (21) (@) 8 years ago ago

@biancavila, I do find it interesting that you’re sort of reversed when it comes to waking up from a dream. For most people they are in a dream and suddenly, and unexpectedly, wake up into this ‘reality’. But for you, because of the narcolepsy, you’re in this ‘reality’ and suddenly, and unexpectedly, find yourself asleep.

Consciousness, dreaming, and sleep are mind-bending concepts. Nobody has any idea why we sleep, why we dream, or where (or what) consciousness is–and narcolepsy encompasses all those topics. Dreams are full on realities while we are in them. No different then this reality. Who is to say that dreams aren’t as real as what you’re experiencing now and who is to say you’re not dreaming right now as you read this. What exactly is the difference between dreaming and reality?

I also think we dream all the time (24/7), but that the sensory inputs from the ‘waking world’ overpower the sensory inputs from dreaming. That is why it is so easy to drift into a daydream at a moments notice, because it is ongoing already.

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Bianca A (101) (@biancavila) 8 years ago ago

@arenotlost, that first part is actually untrue. If i accidentally drift off into sleep (which doesn’t happen often) and wake up, the awakening feels very sudden. It’s kind of like “Oh shit! What happened?! I need to stay awake!”

After pondering over it for a bit, I’ve come to the conclusion that the main difference between my dream-state and reality is that in my reality, events happen sequentially, whereas in my dream-state, events happen, but usually in no particular order. Although sometimes, but very rarely, my dreams do happen in a way where I can retell them as if it were a story. Also, sensory information is different. Not exactly sure how right now, but there is a big difference.
Which brings up the questions in response to your last paragraph, what do you mean by “sensory inputs… overpower the sensory inputs from dreaming”? Could you please describe your definitions of the sensory inputs in each state?

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Anonymous (21) (@) 8 years ago ago

@biancavila, I meant sensory inputs in terms of touch, taste, feel, sight, hearing. I think we are always dreaming, but during our ‘awake’ periods the sensory inputs of this reality overpower those of our dreams. But when we go to sleep in a quiet place, eyes closed, with little ‘external’ sensory inputs then I think our dreams become more prominent. Nothing to back this up. Just a theory.

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K_Rey (2) (@kailin) 8 years ago ago

@biancavila, I made the mistake for years of thinking i could not dream, for me sleep was like an end of existence, as simple and whole as death ( to try and describe it). Dreaming for me was completely learned, although now i think that i’ve always dreamed but forgot them so completely by the time i woke up as to believe they never existed. Making it a daily practice of thinking about my dreams (i rarely use a journal) has increased the number of dreams i have to 2-3 memorable ones every night. Also, I don’t know if it’s just how i dream or the way i remember them, but they do not happen in order either, it’s always snippets of different places and situations, even during lucid dreams.

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Zykanthos (4,757)M (@chodebalm) 8 years ago ago

@blankey, That was fuckin badass dude. Good post. =)

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Eric (1,819)M (@blankey) 7 years, 5 months ago ago

thanks man! I really appreciate it! :)

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Wizard (1) (@awildwizard) 8 years ago ago

@blankey Were you smoking while learning to lucid dream? I feel as though I personally have had almost no dreams since I started to toke which has discouraged me from diving further into that pool at this moment.

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Eric (1,819)M (@blankey) 8 years ago ago

@awildwizard, Actually yeah, when I started lucid dreaming pretty consistently I was so content with life (from meditation, yoga, and a few mushroom trips) that I didn’t feel the need to smoke. If it showed up in my life, I might partake, but other than that I was pretty much off it. I also did notice that not smoking helped with dreaming but then again, you do dream EVERY night so it might just be you not remembering it due to the pot. But then again this is all subjective. Could be different for others.

So in the end, I would recommend laying off smoking maybe when you are close to sleeping. Going to sleep sober helped, for the most part. Although, one time in college I was smoking pretty much every day before bed and I had the most insane dreams I have ever had to date. Lucid dreaming which turned into an OBE which then turned into me being felt like I was being tickled by the gods through vibrations of love while staring and laughing at the most hysterically psychedelic rectangular, hopping, smiling thing… haha It was insane. It was also when I was reading Adventures Beyond the Body. Just reading that booked caused some weiiirdd shit to happen. But fun :)

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