Alternative means of higher education?

Emily (@focsle) 8 years, 9 months ago

So I found this really interesting program called Camphill education. It offers diplomas in social therapy and curative education (the stuff they do in Waldorf schools). What I thought was really neat was that for the programs, you don’t pay tuition. Instead you live and work at one of their communities, living with adults with developmental disabilities. You receive education in the philosophical basis of the organization as well as practical skill in working with their clients. A lot of their communities are rural and have agriculture and craft shops, so you learn those types of skills as well. Has anyone heard of this program before? You don’t get a degree per say, but I think you can get a degree with a few extra courses at a college. It takes about four years to complete by the looks of it.
http://www.camphillschool.org/
To me this makes so much sense. Instead of paying for your education, it seems instead you work your butt off for it, learning how to provide services of value while actually doing them. Which brings me to my question: have any of you heard of other programs like this? Ones where you truly are an apprentice?

February 26, 2013 at 3:13 pm
Alex (345) (@staylucky) 8 years, 9 months ago ago

I went to a Waldorf school in my teens. It sucked.

The concept was great but it just doesn’t really work with the majority of teenagers in our society at that age. The leisure we’re given and alternate lifestyle we’re afforded was usually exploited by kids who had no interest in learning.

In saying that, I’d like to think the place made me a more rounded human being.

But Rudolf Steiner was an interesting man with some good philosophies.

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Emily (2) (@focsle) 8 years, 9 months ago ago

Hehe I agree, I don’t know how to feel about Waldorf school part. No, its certainly not for everyone. However, I do think though that its a great concept for adult group homes. I visited one recently, it was a working farm where everyone played a meaningful role according to their abilities. Seemed very therapeutic and a strong community.

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Heed them, HEthen (91) (@heedthem) 8 years, 9 months ago ago

@focsle, @staylucky,

So question, staylucky: Did it suck because the other teens taking advantage of it directly and negatively influenced your ability to get the most out of your education?

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Alex (345) (@staylucky) 8 years, 9 months ago ago

@heedthem, Yeah, that was a big part. But I also have OCD so it was easy for me to derail lessons. But I enjoyed the mentality there. We were also taught above the State average, so we all got pretty good results in our final exams. The majority of the teachers there genuinely give a shit about you.

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Heed them, HEthen (91) (@heedthem) 8 years, 9 months ago ago

@staylucky, That sounds pretty rad tbh, I’m sure if it were a college, your experience would be much better.

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Alex (345) (@staylucky) 8 years, 9 months ago ago

@heedthem, It’s made me a much better person thass fo sho.

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