Black Hole in the Pupil

Joseph (@warriors41) 10 years, 4 months ago

You know how they say there’s a black hole in every galaxy? What if there’s a super tiny black hole in every creatures eyes?

January 8, 2012 at 10:50 pm
Sisyphus (48) (@sisyphus) 10 years, 4 months ago ago

Perhaps larger black holes are the eyes of the universe then…

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Duncan Idaho (4) (@didaho) 10 years, 4 months ago ago

@Tine

Dark Matter in a nut shell

Scientists all agree that the universe has way more mass than the sum of all the heavenly bodies (stars, blackholes, planets, rocks, dust etc) combined. They know this because of the way the gravity of the “Dark Matter” is affecting the way the universe is expanding and how the galaxies moves in relation to each other.

They are calling this unknown mass Dark Matter because we cannot see it the way we see stars.

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Bryan Hellard (307)M (@xyver) 10 years, 4 months ago ago

Just throwing this out there, the little spot on your eye (your “blind spot”) is where the optical nerve connects to your retina, so there is a little spot where there are no light sensors.

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Alex (551) (@hollowinfinity) 10 years, 4 months ago ago

This is an amazing idea Joseph! It makes a lot of sense. Well, as much as it currently can. Maybe this is how the universe can observe itself. Stephen hawking called this, “Spooky action at a distance” because rightfully, the universe wouldn’t exist if it wasn’t being observed. The observer is the last piece in the entirety of atomic theory. Most people took this as, “okay, so if i turn around, then it is possible that everything behind me just vanished, and collapsed to a wave-form” But not many people have thought, “maybe the universe is observing itself in an intricate way”
On another note (but still on topic) What exactly happens to light when it enters our bodies? Is it still light by the end result, or something else? Also, I don’t know the validity because I have no way to check this myself, but I definitely remember reading a few places that photons already know where they will end up before leaving its source. So that star 1,000 ly away already knew I would be standing outside looking up to receive that individual photon that entered my eyeball. How does this phenomena relate?
Maybe if we can figure out how light is ‘born’ and how it ‘dies’ then we will learn more about how we as humans are born, and how we die.

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Alex (551) (@hollowinfinity) 10 years, 4 months ago ago

This is an amazing idea Joseph! It makes a lot of sense. Well, as much as it currently can. Maybe this is how the universe can observe itself. Stephen hawking called this, “Spooky action at a distance” because rightfully, the universe wouldn’t exist if it wasn’t being observed. The observer is the last piece in the entirety of atomic theory. Most people took this as, “okay, so if i turn around, then it is possible that everything behind me just vanished, and collapsed to a wave-form” But not many people have thought, “maybe the universe is observing itself in an intricate way”
On another note (but still on topic) What exactly happens to light when it enters our bodies? Is it still light by the end result, or something else? Also, I don’t know the validity because I have no way to check this myself, but I definitely remember reading a few places that photons already know where they will end up before leaving its source. So that star 1,000 ly away already knew I would be standing outside looking up to receive that individual photon that entered my eyeball. How does this phenomena relate?
Maybe if we can figure out how light is ‘born’ and how it ‘dies’ then we will learn more about how we as humans are born, and how we die.

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Joseph (114) (@warriors41) 10 years, 4 months ago ago

How is light born?
blogs.discovery.com/.a/6a00d8341bf67c53ef0133f4744f19970b-800wi Stars have to explode! Stars can burn hydrogen… helium, but scientists say our sun is the type that can also burn carbon when it becomes a white dwarf.
Aren’t we made primarily of carbon? or is this a myth.


@Tine
I think you’re on the right track.

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Joseph (114) (@warriors41) 10 years, 4 months ago ago

I am skeptical of dark matter because I am skeptical of mass. Isn’t everything around us also moving through space? How can you know for sure the heaviness of burning balls of chemicals, just by looking at it?

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Joseph (114) (@warriors41) 10 years, 4 months ago ago

Does the gravity of the moon affect light heading toward earth. Talking specifically about a solar eclipse, what happens to the dark side of the moon? does it go completely dark? http://cache.gawker.com/assets/images/4/2009/06/504x_eclipse.jpg
Looks kinda like an eye to me.

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Niko (1) (@neekoh) 10 years, 4 months ago ago

what about how a dogs eye reflects light?

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Duncan Idaho (4) (@didaho) 10 years, 4 months ago ago

There are ways to measure the mass of the sun quite accurately – too technical to try and explain here. Chemicals also have mass – just take a look at the periodic table and you will see that hydrogen and helium (the main contents of the sun) also has mass.

As for the moon affecting the light? The gravity of the moon actually alters the curviture of space-time that light passes through.

Ps. There is no dark side of the moon, only the far side of the moon which is never visible from earth

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Duncan Idaho (4) (@didaho) 10 years, 4 months ago ago

While we are on the topic of Mass, Scientists are still very confused about it. They are currently running experiments on the Large Hadron CollIder to learn more about the ‘God Particle’. They are trying to understand how matter gets their mass. It might have someone to do with how energy and matter is interchangeable (e=mc2), they might be trying to find out where mass comes in to the picture.

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Duncan Idaho (4) (@didaho) 10 years, 4 months ago ago

While we are on the topic of Mass, Scientists are still very confused about it. They are currently running experiments on the Large Hadron CollIder to learn more about the ‘God Particle’. They are trying to understand how matter gets their mass. It might have someone to do with how energy and matter is interchangeable (e=mc2), they might be trying to find out where mass comes in to the picture.

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Joseph (114) (@warriors41) 10 years, 4 months ago ago

Is the earths gravity a good tool to use to gain measurement of ALL gravitational measurement? Has gravity escaped this wave particle duality?

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Joseph (114) (@warriors41) 10 years, 4 months ago ago

I would suspect that science and physics has made an error. They have a belief that there is mass that is “missing” in the universe. That there must be something else out there to make up for it. I think the mass is all there, you don’t need to do anything to make up for it, like invent matter. I’ll believe it when I find better meaning for it.

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BirdFlyingHigh (152) (@birdflyinghigh) 10 years, 4 months ago ago

This is a nebula called the hourglass nebula. The color is added in.
http://www.spacetelescope.org/static/archives/images/screen/opo9607a.jpg

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BirdFlyingHigh (152) (@birdflyinghigh) 10 years, 4 months ago ago

I think you are definitely right about the structure of the eyeball being fractally repeated in the ways that black holes interact with stars and galaxies.

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Joseph (114) (@warriors41) 10 years, 4 months ago ago

Yes! I had that pic on my desktop for quite a while. The hourglass nebula is an eye. Who knows if anybody it watching from the other side, but it is an eye.

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Alex (551) (@hollowinfinity) 10 years, 4 months ago ago

Well scientists believe that nothing has mass at all, which is why they are searching for the god particle. This particle supposedly gives off a field around it, which in turn GIVES the mass to the other particles. It’s almost like an electromagnetic field in the very micro world.

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Joseph (114) (@warriors41) 10 years, 4 months ago ago

If this particle obeys laws of gravity, and observation is needed to find it… perhaps this particle is the subset of the fractal geometry or wave nature. Meaning that inside a bubble, like a black hole, there needn’t be anything inside it, because circles like that just repeat to “infinity”. Where is “infinity”? On the surface of the bubble.

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Duncan Idaho (4) (@didaho) 10 years, 4 months ago ago

I agree that scientists still do not understand everything, and our understanding of the universe is still not absolute. I’m just going by the most widely accepted beliefs of from the scientists who invested billions of dollars and millions of hours in to hard research to find the answers to these tough questions.

Just 100 years ago, we all believed the world was flat, this was a fact (at the time). It took guys like you to challenge science and find the truth

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Duncan Idaho (4) (@didaho) 10 years, 4 months ago ago

I agree that scientists still do not understand everything, and our understanding of the universe is still not absolute. I’m just going by the most widely accepted beliefs of from the scientists who invested billions of dollars and millions of hours in to hard research to find the answers to these tough questions.

Just 100 years ago, we all believed the world was flat, this was a fact (at the time). It took guys like you to challenge science and find the truth

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Duncan Idaho (4) (@didaho) 10 years, 4 months ago ago

@Bird,

“I think you are definitely right about the structure of the eyeball being fractally repeated in the ways that black holes interact with stars and galaxies.”

What do you think about webcams? Since they are basically a mechanical version of an eyeball, and they work on the same principles – bending and focusing light on to a sensor.

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Duncan Idaho (4) (@didaho) 10 years, 4 months ago ago

@Bird,

“I think you are definitely right about the structure of the eyeball being fractally repeated in the ways that black holes interact with stars and galaxies.”

What do you think about webcams? Since they are basically a mechanical version of an eyeball, and they work on the same principles – bending and focusing light on to a sensor.

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BirdFlyingHigh (152) (@birdflyinghigh) 10 years, 4 months ago ago

Joseph, can you explain the bubble infinity thing again?

Niko, you brought up the fact that dog’s eyes reflect light. That’s because they have an extra layer of light-reflective tissue behind their retina. This layer reflects the light back through the lens from the other side – it improves their night vision. It’s called a “tapetum lucidum”. Found in nocturnal creatures, usually carnivores. (wikipedia) I just thought I’d post this, because your comment made me look it up and I thought I might as well share what I’d found.


@Duncan
, I think the webcam is an example of humans creating tools that rely on physical properties seen throughout the universe. Pretty cool.

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BirdFlyingHigh (152) (@birdflyinghigh) 10 years, 4 months ago ago

Joseph, can you explain the bubble infinity thing again?

Niko, you brought up the fact that dog’s eyes reflect light. That’s because they have an extra layer of light-reflective tissue behind their retina. This layer reflects the light back through the lens from the other side – it improves their night vision. It’s called a “tapetum lucidum”. Found in nocturnal creatures, usually carnivores. (wikipedia) I just thought I’d post this, because your comment made me look it up and I thought I might as well share what I’d found.


@Duncan
, I think the webcam is an example of humans creating tools that rely on physical properties seen throughout the universe. Pretty cool.

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