CrossFit

Matt (@greenthinker) 10 years, 5 months ago

Anyone here ever done it? I have been lifting for about 4 years now and i must say CrossFit is pretty much the complete opposite of conventional lifting.

The only way I could justify doing exercises so out of form is if they actually built your body up for "functional" activities. For example if I am trying to pull someone up onto a platform I am not going to bicep curl them up, I am going to just "pull" and have my body use what ever muscles are easiest.

Thoughts about crossfit?

December 13, 2011 at 6:32 pm
Brent (0) (@bhale) 10 years, 5 months ago ago

I went to a few CrossFit classes a few years ago and it completely changed the way I workout. I mostly workout at home, but everything I do is based off of CrossFit’s mantra of high-rep, large range-of-motion exercises.

The way I look at it is to consider how much athletically superior prehistoric man was in comparison to the modern man. They didn’t have a set time period in their day to lift large rocks in accordance to specific sets and repetitions. They just ran after shit, climbed up trees, carried dead animal carcasses on their backs for miles, threw spears, etc.

Have you gone to any CrossFit classes yet?

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It’s a pretty good system. Honestly I would never just stick to one program for long, it’s good to mix up the kinds of exercises you do, along with the reps, sets and duration.

Brent prehistoric man was in no way superior to modern man physically. Perhaps you mean the average modern man (in which case you are probably right). However, I’d like to see a caveman compete in a strongman, powerlifting, or olympic lifting competition. At a high level we have advanced so far athletically.

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Lifting heavy (through a full range of motion) actually increases flexibility.

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Brent (0) (@bhale) 10 years, 5 months ago ago

http://www.metro.co.uk/news/754294-ancient-man-faster-than-usain-bolt-and-stronger-than-schwarzenegger

Peter McAllister wrote a book called Manthropology about the subject. I suppose I’m just taking a lot of his book to be fact, and proving those facts would be nearly impossible. However, he does state some pretty crazy stuff, like the average Neanderthal woman could beat Arnold Schwarzenegger in an arm wrestling match, or that the average aboriginal man could run faster than Usain Bolt.

Also, I don’t consider strongman, powerlifting, and olympic lifting to be the best showcase of athletic talent, as pure strength is only one aspect of athletic ability. Agility, endurance, speed, hand-eye coordination and skill also have to be considered.

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Anonymous (0) (@) 10 years, 5 months ago ago

I like the idea crossfit, just not how they implement it. One of the arguments I have heard against it, is if you had a ferrari, you wouldn’t drive it all out every day. The same thing with your body. You do not get stronger from working out, you get stronger when your body rebuilds all the tissue that you just tore apart. Recovery is when you actually improve, without it you will stagnate. I’ve been a coach for cycling, but any halfway decent sports physiologist will tell you the same thing. The body needs recovery.
Now incorporating crossfit into a normal training regimen is great in my opinion, and what I do personally

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Daniel (7) (@meta) 10 years, 5 months ago ago

I’ve been doin CrossFit for about a year and a half now it I absolutely love it. If you want to get in shape then this is a great way to do it. I also love that they promote the Paleo diet as to give an all around training experience. CrossFit is a full-body workout, everytime. My only issue is that I have weak wrists so many of the excercises (especially cleans) put a lot of stress on them.

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Manimal (2,998) (@manimal) 10 years, 5 months ago ago

It’s a nice workout system, not the best there is but still pretty damn good. Especially compared to most of the shit most people are doing. Not intense enough for me though.


@Brent
I gotta read that book. Even the name is awesome haha. But if those are the criteria you consider for athletic talent, what about comparing cavemen to martial artists of today? Some practitioners of gungfu and ninjutsu are pretty damn extreme, if there was anyone worthy of the title superhuman it’s them. I doubt cavemen could compare to that.


@Daniel
That’s the way it’s supposed to go. It makes you stronger. Sometimes massive hypercompensation is the best way to go, rather than easing into shit. As long as it doesn’t hurt it’s fine.

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