education vs work.

 Hitomi (@kidvisions) 10 years, 7 months ago

People say that your education is the only factor that will determine your job in the future. what do you think? and how could anyone be successful professionally without a great degree?

March 23, 2011 at 3:46 pm
Syn.Ther. (46) (@luna) 10 years, 7 months ago ago

There are millions of examples, from rags to riches. Been there, done that, lost, won, experience. What is success? for you.

which competences do you have, how can they provide for you…. it is way more than merely education which determines a career.

Who is your biggest Idol?

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Hitomi (67) (@kidvisions) 10 years, 7 months ago ago

Just being able to provide for your family and lead a descent life.

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Iuvenesco (1) (@iuvenesco) 10 years, 7 months ago ago

A degree is a piece of paper. This piece of paper is given to prospective employers you wish to work under. It merely acts as a generic resume which establishes the fact that you went to some form of higher education in order to attain a foundation in what ever field applicable. If you don’t want to work under a potential employer or you would rather use an actual resume–which is a direct reflection of the experience and work you’ve put in (given that you work your way up)–you can be perfectly successful. There are no rules. Successful people simply tend to come from degrees.

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Syn.Ther. (46) (@luna) 10 years, 7 months ago ago

The value of a degree is rapidly diminishing, the educational possibilities are endless, online studies, universities and as many degrees as you wish, however none of them will prepare you for the world we are in today. Its knowledge I agree can be a foundation, however there is no truth in a degree being a passport to success. I do believe of course it depends also on your cultural background and environment.

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Iuvenesco (1) (@iuvenesco) 10 years, 7 months ago ago

I refuse to go to any sort of higher education.

And once my service in the Navy has expired, I refuse to be employed by anyone.

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Hitomi (67) (@kidvisions) 10 years, 7 months ago ago

It also depends on the country you live in. In Tunisia degrees are really important even though they usually do not reflect students levels: the system is outdated and there is a lot of cheating in the exams.

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Syn.Ther. (46) (@luna) 10 years, 7 months ago ago

I rest my case on its value then……

But I am fortunate, living in the Netherlands… experience and competence are key to position, and if you are courageous your own enterprise… it is a lot of hard work, but the freedom is worth it, at least for me.

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Brandon (1) (@bvaldezz) 10 years, 7 months ago ago

This is a huge day-to-day battle with me. As a current college student I find myself asking myself ALL the time whether I’m wasting my time. My big thing is that I’m going to spend all this money getting this “piece of paper” and then go get a “big boy job” and be working for the next 50-60 years of my life. Where in that time-frame is “me-time”? You always hear older people say, “Travel now, while you’re young, otherwise you’ll never get around to it!” I feel like I am already unable to do what I want to do, and I am 20 years old.

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Kyle (131) (@kyle) 10 years, 7 months ago ago

http://www.youngentrepreneur.com/blog/100-top-entrepreneurs-who-succeeded-without-a-college-degree/

Abraham Lincoln, lawyer, U.S. president. Finished one year of formal schooling, self-taught himself trigonometry, and read Blackstone on his own to become a lawyer.

first example, even though that was way back, it has plenty of current highly successful millionaires that did it with out a degree. I myself am wondering if it is worth getting a degree to be professionally successful.

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Kenny (5) (@kenny) 10 years, 7 months ago ago

I often question myself as to why I’m in college and if it’s worth it. Don’t get me wrong, those who want to become doctors, engineers etc. I think that college is a great place for them but I have goals and things I want to do that do not pertain to any course work. I have grown myself much more than I have academically in school. I know in my heart that I don’t want to work 9-5 for someone until I die. I have the same feelings as many of you.

However. We cannot deny that there are many more people who didn’t make it compared to those who did. There are many more people who dropped out and live an unfulfilled/unhappy life . I’m sure that many of them have the same dreams that we all do. Whether it is living a life of bliss doing what they want to do or just being rich.

With that being said. How are you going to guarantee yourself that you will make your dreams a reality? I don’t know the exact answer yet but I do know that being mediocre isn’t going to cut it. Everything isn’t going to fall into place like you want it to.

talk is cheap. take action to make your dreams a reality. life doesn’t start tomorrow.
http://inoveryourhead.net/life-doesnt-begin-tomorrow/

A short video of inspiration.

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Ben (231)M (@benjamin) 10 years, 7 months ago ago

Certainly it can be a good foundation, and some career paths require a degree. I want to teach English, so I’ll certainly be going to college and getting a degree. But in reality, I don’t think you need one. There are many ways to earn alot of cash without one if you’re halfway creative. Also, you don’t need the kind of money a degree brings. If you have a car, a house, and food every day, then you are richer than (if I remember correctly) 80% of the world, and live like a king compared to the majority of the world’s population. It can just seem like you need that much money if you’re surrounded by people who all have these things, because that creates the illusion that rich is the minimum.
I guess my advice is that if having a degree could help you pursue your passion, or if pursuing your passion requires one like mine does, then go get it. But, if a degree would distract you from accomplishing your ultimate goals, don’t.

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Martijn Schirp (112,780)A (@martijn) 10 years, 7 months ago ago

My advice would be to follow your passion while getting your degree, if you have a high chance of making your passion a sustainable source of income that you can keep doing for awhile then you could quit your degree, if not, you always have a back up plan. Even though getting a degree isn’t that special anymore and it turns more often than not an insurance it still has it’s worth in learning discipline, academical skills and how to network.

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