How do you learn? And Holistic Learning techniques

 Max Nachamkin (@feren6)8 years, 1 month ago

Back in high school, I read this e-book on Holistic Learning techniques. It’s a pretty simple concept..instead of trying to memorize information, we should really aim to truly understand the information through using metaphors, visualization, and linking concepts together.

are you guys are already familiar with this, or if not, how else do you learn?

I try not to flat out use rote memorization anymore unless I have to, but since I incorporated these techniques in high school I’ve gotten a 3.5 GPA without really trying. Work smarter, not harder, right?

I find visualization and metaphors to be the most powerful, so I try to do that whenever I can. That and i try and figure out how I would explain it on /r/explainitlikei’mfive

Here’s the ebook: http://www.scotthyoung.com/blog/Programs/HolisticLearningEBook.pdf

Thoughts? How do you guys learn? Any cool techniques?

December 19, 2012 at 11:51 am
Alan Sanford (33) (@chronomortae) 8 years, 1 month ago ago

For mathematics I think it’s a mix. The early concepts like addition, multiplication, division, subtraction, the tools you use to solve higher up concepts is best if they’re memorized, so they become more like second nature. When I was young I remember solving thousands and thousands (literally. Korea has workbooks that are nothing but 3000 problems on algebra) of problems and memorizing multiplication tables. But when I got up to the precals/calc level, it became easier to visualize what the equations were trying to explain. Like double integrals are finding area, triple for volume and this is actually the way calculus books try to teach, through visualization.
For Physics, once again part memorization part visualization. It’s useful if you just memorize the newtonian physics equations and kinematics and the basic ones, but later on when you go on to solving a problem it requires a good deal of visualizing on a hypothetical realm. For instance, if the problem tells you no air friction, you have to visualize a place in your head that doesn’t have any air molecules.
So I’d say basic tools of a subject, memorize. It makes life easier. Once you get to the higher concepts, visualize.

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Anonymous (60) (@) 8 years, 1 month ago ago

@chronomortae, it’s generally accepted that people need a foundation to build on.

You may find this interesting

http://www.xamuel.com/rote-memorization-in-mathematics/

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Alan Sanford (33) (@chronomortae) 8 years, 1 month ago ago

@dalniente, I agree totally with this guy (even his way of doing the quotient rule – it was always a hassle trying to remember if it was the numerator or the denominator that was divided first). For me the biggest joy in math is learning a formula, and then afterwards learning HOW that formula came to be and how it works. When that happens, I get this Eureka moment that leaves me mind-blown for several minutes (during which I start giggling and laughing to myself, alarming nearby classmates)
And yes, the calc courses in universities for undergrads do move too fast. They expect you to memorize everything, and when that’s the case I usually get very, very bored in math lectures. Which is why I ended up not going to any lecture for nearly two months and studied all the material myself (which was much more fulfilling, mind you)
But thank you for the link! I enjoyed it greatly.

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Tine (366) (@tine) 8 years, 1 month ago ago

@feren6,

all memorization techniques i have read about use visuals as mental anchors, so i’m not surprised you’ve seen an improvement

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Dan (890) (@danfontaine) 8 years, 1 month ago ago

I always did this through highschool. But fuck academics. Dur ta dur let’s memorize strands of information. Sike, imma draw in your class and still retain your shit better than the kids taking notes.

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Dan (890) (@danfontaine) 8 years, 1 month ago ago

Pure awareness is the best form of learning. Train your awareness muscle.

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Anonymous (60) (@) 8 years, 1 month ago ago

@chronomortae, my cat’s about to get himself thrown out, he keeps on trying to jump on my laptop. :(

I agree that some memorization is necessary, especially in the early years. Again, you need a foundation to work on, and there are practical reasons for memorization. Personally, I tend to learn fast, and spend much of my time looking into concepts for a better understanding. It should be made clear that memorization is not necessarily understanding, but not everyone desires that deeper level of understanding. In my experience, it is better for when I’m self-teaching, which is what Scott Young has often emphasized in the past.

I deleted my first post because I just saw his most recent blog post (I don’t want to crowd up the first page), and it was relevant to what I said about the MIT challenge. I appreciate his dedication, but his results didn’t blow me away.

Here you go:

What I Would Change About the MIT Challenge

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MPHill (775) (@everymorningbornfromtheashes) 8 years, 1 month ago ago

This is really helpful thank you so so so so so so mcuh

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Anonymous (1) (@) 6 years, 6 months ago ago

i think it’s easy to learn once you see everything as a choice, not an obligation. learning is friggin awesome but school makes people hate it. like check this out: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hxLn7eVRGOQ

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