Intelligence: a Blessing or a Curse?

 Will (@TheBigElectron)6 years, 7 months ago

Greetings HEthens,

I’d like to talk about intelligence vs. stupidity.

More specifically, I intend to address these questions:
Is ignorance truly bliss? And, if so, is being stupid – that is, being perpetually ignorant – by extension, more enjoyable than being intelligent?

My thesis is that the answer to both of these questions is “yes”.

It’s normally socially unacceptable to even attempt to speak objectively of one’s own level of intelligence; I don’t care, because I really want to have this discussion. I consider myself to be a very intelligent person. I didn’t ask or choose or seek out to be that way; if I were given the choice, knowing what I now know, I would choose to be less intelligent than I am. I believe that the reason I am intelligent is mainly because both of my parents are very intelligent. I don’t believe that it makes me superior to anyone else. I’m fully aware that a hallmark of intelligence is humility – one is never supposed to proclaim oneself to be intelligent – but all that is social convention, and right now, I really don’t care about that. I mean, is Michael Phelps not allowed to proclaim himself to be “a very athletic person?” Come on.

That said, I think that this particular community – HighExistence – is brimming with highly intelligent individuals, so I do not consider myself to be unique here, which is precisely why I feel that this is the perfect place to have this discussion.

If you think it is arrogant of me to speak of my own intelligence this way, I hope you will say so frankly.

Anyway, the idea for this discussion occurred to me when I was watching Family Guy S13E08. I found that this particular episode hit very close to home for me; it really touched a nerve.

For those who haven’t seen it, I’ll give the quickest synopsis I possibly can: Brian – one of the main characters of the show, who is (normally) very intelligent – gets a brain tumor. This basically has the effect of lowering his IQ by a few dozen points, turning him into a raunchy, classless oaf. As a result, he becomes more successful at socializing with the rest of the characters, who are all pretty dopey themselves, except for Stewie.
Meanwhile, Stewie – who is even more intelligent than Brian, and was best friends with him prior to the tumor – finds himself feeling distressed and lonely because he can no longer relate to Brian.
At the end of the episode, Stewie tricks Brian into having his tumor surgically removed by telling him that the operation will “give him two weiners.” (lol!)
After the operation is complete and Brian’s former intelligence is restored, the following dialogue ensues:
Stewie: I missed you, buddy. Welcome back.
Brian: Thanks, Stewie. You never gave up on me. You knew that wasn’t really me.
Stewie: Yeah, well, it’s no big …
Brian: (passive-aggressively) I mean, I was havin’ fun, makin’ new friends, gettin’ laid all the time, sleepin’ like a rock, but you made the call. You unilaterally decided I was better off a bitter, alcoholic failure, who can only hang out with [you].

As I examine my own life, I find that I agree with the sentiment of Brian’s last statement: I would rather be stupid. My own intelligence, it appears, has always been a source of pain and isolation for me.

There is a long narrative behind this, which I would love to tell, but, in the interest of brevity, I will condense it into this generalization: the more I have utilized my intelligence throughout my life, the less happy I’ve been.

In fact, the happiest years of my life were those in which I explicitly decided that I would dumb myself down. This was around 13-14 years of age. I stopped taking advanced classes in school; I ceased to pursue such interests as politics, science, and philosophy, and instead became artificially interested in celebrities and sports; I quit reading books, which, until then, had been my favorite passtime; I stopped playing DnD and started skateboarding, despite being a kickass DM and a terrible skater. I began to mimic the interests of the kids in my school who had what I wanted: mainly, female attention.

And do you know what? For as long as I kept doing that, my life was awesome. Within a year, I went from hating to absolutely loving life. Before I made these changes, I frequently had suicidal thoughts, and once came very close to bringing those thoughts to fruition. After making these changes, I distinctly remember frequently thinking to myself, “If I died right now, I’d be so happy with my life.”

Before, I was a loser: lonely, nearly friend-less, unathletic, unattractive, alienated, constantly picked-on, socially clueless. But inside of a year after making those changes, I developed athletic ability, became one of the most popular kids in my school, took shit from nobody, found myself with more female admirers than I knew what to do with… Yeah, things were pretty great.

However, due to my parents’ radical disapproval of my new lifestyle, and because all of my elders and teachers and family were telling me to “get serious about my life,” because if I didn’t, I was going to “end up a hopeless bum,” I soon went back to my old, intelligent, loser-y ways.

God, do I regret it.

I could go on about this for ages, but I’ll leave it there for now.

HEthens, what do you think?

February 8, 2015 at 2:02 am
Azzipog (3) (@azzipog) 6 years, 7 months ago ago

It seems that most of the wisest people are not very happy. Many of the worlds brightest minds (especially writers) have been plagued by psychological disorders such as depression and anxiety. The philosophy students I know tend to all suffer from depression. Taoism seems to promote a mentality of accepting life without questioning too much as a means of achieving happiness. I am no specialist in animal psychology, however it seems that most animals don’t have existential crises they focus on the immediate moment and thus are free of worry. Maybe living this way is the best shot we have of happiness. Many world religions promote faith which is acceptance despite proof. This is a way of reducing the need for us to contemplate many of life’s unknowable mysteries. Is the point of this to make us happier because we don’t have to think so much? Children are generally happier and don’t suffer as much from depression. Is this because they don’t concern themselves with many of the questions we face as we age?

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Will (27) (@TheBigElectron) 6 years, 7 months ago ago

Right on.

So, if being intellectual causes psychological pain (I would argue that it does, and your post seems to agree that it is at least correlated), why be intellectual?

I mean, I can solve a 2nd-order differential equation. I can calculate the trajectory of a projectile with variable acceleration, while accounting for gravity and air resistance. I can easily predict the events and outcomes of almost all modern TV shows and movies (except the really creative ones, which are few and far between). I enjoy the works of Shakespeare and Mozart far more than those of Michael Bay or Jay-Z. I can see right through mental brainwashing and manipulation techniques like advertising and propaganda.

Whoop-de-fuckin-doo to all that, I say. None of that stuff is satisfying or really useful, and much of it is depressing; in fact, I often wish I could “turn off” my intellect. Most especially, I wish that I could “enjoy the ride” of modern, popular entertainment, like for instance the incredibly formulaic movie “The Interview,” which most of my peers seemed to love, but which I found, quite frankly, idiotic.

What I’d really like to be able to do is to go out to a bar or club and have a good time like everyone else my age. I’d really like to go to a party where I don’t feel completely alone amidst the crowd; where I don’t have to fake a phone call or make a dozen unnecessary trips to the bathroom, just for appearance’s sake. But that’s about the most challenging thing in the world for me.

I guess I must be intellectually arrogant, huh? Perhaps what I describe is a sort of trap that highly-intelligent people are particularly vulnerable to?

I know there’s a simple solution to this, because I’ve solved these same problems in my life before, but I guess the answer is elusive in its simplicity. I’ve got to start being less mind-identified. It’s decided: that’s my mission in life, for the time being.

Here’s to the dumb ones!

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landisian (7) (@landisian) 6 years, 6 months ago ago

I know exactly what you mean about that. I see patterns and probabilities everywhere I look. It’s frustrating sometimes when it seems so easy for the few of us free thinkers, who can look beneath what the eyes can see. By that I mean seeing things for what they truly are and not what they appear to be. To see beyond all the propaganda and bull Shit that society tells us to look at. I get it. I really do. I have a great imagination and I can imagine anything. Even stuff most wouldn’t want to. It’s like a video game that you used all the cheats for. It gets boring quick. But life like everything else in our physical or mental universe is a double edged sword. You just have to decide how you want to use it.

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Crazy Bag Lady (1) (@CrazyBagLady) 6 years, 6 months ago ago

Wisest people are unhappy? Well they are wise enough to know it’s a choice to let it rule you or not

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Will (27) (@TheBigElectron) 6 years, 7 months ago ago

Correction: I realized that I am talking more about “intellectualism” than “intelligence” for most of this post.

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Roman Remus (0) (@Limbo) 6 years, 7 months ago ago

I believe that inteligence is both a burden and a bless. What i mean is, why have a happy life when you know that all your joy is false? Less intelligent individuals are not that happy (in my oppinion), their happiness is just consisted of the silence of their unhappiness. I’d choose carrying the burden of my own intelligence and at least feel real emotions, rather than going through my life blindfolded, being fakely happy.

I also believe that happiness could be achieved by intelligent individuals once they learn how to live their life. Maybe through art, meditation, religion, who knows. Also this pain of living an intelligent life is not so horrible, there’s days and days. Yeah people often think about suicide, but if they actually get to the point of doing it i believe it’s not such a big deal. Death is a simple natural happening, only people think about it as a horrible thing. If everybody would contemplate about their death at least 2 minutes everyday their life would dramatically improve, because, in the end, we all go away and everything seen from up high looks insignificant.

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LVX (297) (@Vovinawol) 6 years, 7 months ago ago

Ignorance is bliss because few have the wisdom and understanding enough to realize within a certain actuality that our physical existence is an illusion in many ways. Having our feet on the ground and also our head in the
stars sounds great as a concept, until it becomes a reality that is strange to those who are “Higher Self Blind”. We become even more alone because we cannot see what we see for other people. A knowing of an enlightened person that has no words to tell himself or herself what it is that he/she knows is expected to answer those who do not realize the truth of their self in some words or phrases. A master once said “Know Thyself”… a simple tell all phrase that goes totally unrealized the more we think about it. The conscious mind telling us what we think our ego is composed of is not the same as the aforementioned I am sorry to say. What would 3 masters sitting at a coffee shop say to each other concerning our existence? They would each merely look at one another with an odd smirk on their faces. None of the above even matters though, as it is all just words and hot air.

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Noreen (0) (@Noreen) 6 years, 7 months ago ago

Your thoughts make absolute sense to me. I find it very difficult to converse without dumbing myself down to the majority who are consumed by either (or all) sports, religion, consumerism and celebrity culture. A mere mention of issues such as homelessness, Asian sweatshops, domestic violence, human trafficing or anything that requires serious thought has been met with outright dissmissiveness and even aggression on occasion. My intention to simply raise awareness about what I learn in a relatively small minded rural community is seen as an attempt to ‘bring people down’ or that I think I am better than everyone else, ‘lording it over others’ etc, and conversation quickly reverts back to some superficial unimportant topic.

Of course, we all need a break from serious issues and I do enjoy watching sports, enjoy good humour and appreciate food, items and services, however I try to do so with an awareness and conscience about impact, source and ethics.

Agree that ignorance is bliss and sometimes wish I did not have the thirst for knowledge that has led to me knowing all I know and being so frustrated and depressed by not being able to find away ‘fix’ any of the unjust in this world.

To successfully socialise and get on with wide variety of people, I try to be mindful to keep conversation appropriate to the people or group I am with and do you know what? I am glad to have (most of) them in my life to lighten me up with trivia and humour. In fact, I’d go bloody insane without them!

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LVX (297) (@Vovinawol) 6 years, 7 months ago ago

I’m glad that you got something out of that, because as I re-read what I wrote I am beginning to confuse myself over it. It is definitely easier for others to attack you rather than see that you may have something to offer. It has taken me decades to see just how dark and blind the norm is, and all the while trying to tell myself that people are really not like that, but they are. To bring up issues of all that is wrong only threatens the bliss of the ignorant who choose to remain that way. And we are labeled as the negative ones.

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Denialism (9) (@mcrliveit) 6 years, 7 months ago ago

This is my article on university’s website about intelligence. http://boldjournal.org/2015/02/02/high-intelligence/

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LVX (297) (@Vovinawol) 6 years, 7 months ago ago

After all we study, what is it that we really think we know? I mean since size as well as intelligence is relative in the long run. From another perspective that can’t be spoken of from this perception of our so called existence, the most intelligent human just may be an idiot in comparison.

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Ghost (9) (@ghost244) 6 years, 7 months ago ago

you might enjoy the short(ish) story “Flowers For Algernon”
There is no easy way to answer, while higher intellect leads to an appreciation of different things than the ‘norm’ it also leads to a deeper understanding of life in general which is most definitely a blessing. However, with higher intellect often comes alienation and a difficulty relating to others. That being said, often times i wish i was an idiot but when i see people with mental retardation or even ‘normal’ people i do not envy their lack of insight.
ask yourself,
is it better to be a black sheep that knows he’s a black sheep or a ‘normal’ sheep that thinks he’s rainbow colored.

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Will (27) (@TheBigElectron) 6 years, 7 months ago ago

I’ll check out that short story. I remember we had to read it for school, but can’t remember what it was about, other than it involved a certain mouse or rat or some kind of rodent.

I like your comparison to sheep. Not only is it insightful, but funny as well. Thanks :)

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Almeida (304) (@xetado) 6 years, 7 months ago ago

Intelligence can be any of these two, it’s up to you. You feel miserable because you judge yourself for not doing what you think you ought to do. You have created a false notion that intelligence won’t help you getting attractive, athletic, happy, socially satisfied. Is it intelligent not to care for you body? After all, your mind is deeply connected to it. Is it intelligent not to share you life with others? Don’t forget that we, humans, need social interaction, and our brain also works best with a good amount of it. Is it intelligent to be unhappy? At last, everything turns into suffering and dissatisfaction, leading some of our fellow brothers to end their lives. What is really making you sad is your attitude towards your previously established idea of happiness, not your intelligence. Keep thinking that your inner peace is trapped in a certain lifestyle and it will stay there.

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Will (27) (@TheBigElectron) 6 years, 7 months ago ago

Thanks for this response. I was hoping to get challenged to take a deeper look at myself, and you’ve done that. I very much appreciate your candor.

Before I respond, I want to acknowledge that, in writing this response, I am diving deeply into my own dysfunctional ego. On a certain level, I sense that much of what I’m about to say about myself isn’t strictly true (because it’s all ego-created) and I trust this intuitive feeling more than I trust what my ego tells me. In other words, I’m not “sold,” as it were, on the identity that I’m presenting in this post.

You say that I’ve “created a false notion that intelligence won’t help [me] getting [where I want to be].” As you said, I do indeed feel that it is no practical help to me; I feel as though all it’s good for is mental masturbation, and I’ve done as much of that as I can stomach already. Are you suggesting that it WOULD help me, if only I didn’t have this “false notion?”

Indeed, my intuition tells me that, if I am, in fact, intelligent, then I ought to be capable of doing whatever it is that I decide to do. But, if that were true, then why do I have so much difficulty doing what I want? Am I, in fact, stupid? I’d be willing to consider that possibility, but if I’m stupid, how could it have been so simple for me to breeze through school, and halfway through an engineering degree at a well-known university, before I found any of it difficult or challenging? How come it was always my test everyone wanted to copy answers from? You see the source of my confusion here, and why my ego concludes that I am both intelligent and incapable.

“Is it intelligent not to care for your body?”
Actually, I take excellent care of my body. I exercise daily and eat an extremely healthy diet; I eat more organic vegetables than I do anything else. My body fat percentage, last time I checked, was 9%, and my resting heart rate is 50 bpm – on paper and in photographs, I look like I’d make a good athlete.
However, I’m still lousy at sports, and get outperformed by guys with beer bellies all the time, which makes my 6 pack look a bit ridiculous on me, I think.
My ego doesn’t understand why I do it. Care for my body, I mean. I don’t feel like it’s very rewarding, honestly; it’s a bit alienating not to eat the way my handful of friends do, and I think I’d feel better about my lack of athleticism if I could blame it on being fat. But, whatever. That 6 pack is fun to look at in the mirror, I guess. And I do get a vague feeling of superiority over people who don’t take care of themselves; not that I want it, but I can’t seem to help it. These are just more forms of figurative masturbation.

“Is it intelligent not to share your life with others?”
No, it’s not. I’m fully aware that this area of my life needs improvement more than probably anything else.
This is the real heart of my dysfunction, I believe. Almost always, I can’t seem to behave around others the way I would like to. In the moment, I’m very aware that I’m not behaving the way I want to, which makes me anxious and frustrated, which worsens the problem, which makes me more anxious and frustrated, and so on. Naturally, they eventually come to see me as an anxious and frustrated person; what else could they see? When I sense that this is how they see me, I feel ashamed and don’t want to be around them anymore.
I was going to follow that up with, “But I don’t know how to behave the way I want to anymore; I used to know how, etc etc” but then I realized that would just be a bullshit excuse that doesn’t even make sense. The truth must be that I’m afraid – that is the only logical explanation. I guess the first step’s admitting it, huh?

“Is it intelligent to be unhappy?”
No, it isn’t. I guess that makes me dumb? Lol. I dunno what else to say to this one.

“What is really making you sad is your attitude toward your previously established idea of happiness”
I don’t quite understand this. What is the attitude you are referring to?

Thanks again for your tough love, amigo. And thanks to this community for allowing me to vent this negative energy. I’ll make up for it in spreading good vibes!

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Almeida (304) (@xetado) 6 years, 7 months ago ago

“You say that I’ve “created a false notion that intelligence won’t help [me] getting [where I want to be].”

As you said, I do indeed feel that it is no practical help to me; I feel as though all it’s good for is mental masturbation, and I’ve done as much of that as I can stomach already. Are you suggesting that it WOULD help me, if only I didn’t have this “false notion?”

Indeed, my intuition tells me that, if I am, in fact, intelligent, then I ought to be capable of doing whatever it is that I decide to do. But, if that were true, then why do I have so much difficulty doing what I want? Am I, in fact, stupid? I’d be willing to consider that possibility, but if I’m stupid, how could it have been so simple for me to breeze through school, and halfway through an engineering degree at a well-known university, before I found any of it difficult or challenging? How come it was always my test everyone wanted to copy answers from? You see the source of my confusion here, and why my ego concludes that I am both intelligent and incapable.”

This time, I will be a little biased: yes, it has a huge potential to help you getting things in your life. However, reality’s subjectivity, as always, force us to consider the other way around, as it happened to you. But don’t let that bad experience move you away from intellectuality, I really consider it can be a lot helpful.
Nonetheless, we can’t forget that intellectual intelligence isn’t the only important asset. It isn’t what get us out of bed to do exhausting activities in order to achieve something greater. This ability is, actually, emotional intelligence, the way we can convince the darkest corner of our mind that sacrificing a little TV time or a night with friends is necessary here and there. Remember that those intelligence, in general, is a very wide concept, and we all have weaknesses in certain points, although that doesn’t mean we can’t improve ourselves.

““Is it intelligent not to share your life with others?”
No, it’s not. I’m fully aware that this area of my life needs improvement more than probably anything else.
This is the real heart of my dysfunction, I believe. Almost always, I can’t seem to behave around others the way I would like to. In the moment, I’m very aware that I’m not behaving the way I want to, which makes me anxious and frustrated, which worsens the problem, which makes me more anxious and frustrated, and so on. Naturally, they eventually come to see me as an anxious and frustrated person; what else could they see? When I sense that this is how they see me, I feel ashamed and don’t want to be around them anymore.
I was going to follow that up with, “But I don’t know how to behave the way I want to anymore; I used to know how, etc etc” but then I realized that would just be a bullshit excuse that doesn’t even make sense. The truth must be that I’m afraid – that is the only logical explanation. I guess the first step’s admitting it, huh?”
This is a very common issue among people: we judge ourselves a lot in these situations, mostly badly. I’m figuring this out yet too, but I have learned some things I can share. First, not everyone will like you, it’s impossible. The best we can do is to try and be kind in our way, and accept those who dislike us, without feeling bad about it. Second, you need to quit judging yourself in these situations. Not only it takes away your focus from the conversation, as it worsens your performance in it. I struggled a little to apply that, but confidence and meditation helped me. Oh, and this compassionate and warmhearted thread helped me too: https://www.highexistence.com/topic/obliterating-your-lower-self/

““Is it intelligent to be unhappy?”
No, it isn’t. I guess that makes me dumb? Lol. I dunno what else to say to this one.”
“What is really making you sad is your attitude toward your previously established idea of happiness”
I don’t quite understand this. What is the attitude you are referring to?
Nah, that doesn’t make you dumb. We aren’t intelligent or dumb all the time, we just spend more time being more of a thing and less of another. It’s ok to have bad days, but being unhappy is forgetting the enormous and nearly infinite potential that lies in our hands, right in this moment.
As for the the attitude I was referring to, take a look at this: http://cdn.zenpencils.com/wp-content/uploads/2012-08-02-happiness.jpg
You can’t have anything standing between you and happiness. Dissatisfaction makes us go after better versions of ourselves, it’s warm, driving, powerful, unhappiness is not, it’s cold and makes us immobile.
I suggest you take a look at The Power of Now, from Eckhart Tolle, if you haven’t.

I wish you the best too, bro. Much love.

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wunderlost (0) (@dasrite) 6 years, 7 months ago ago

I believe there is nothing in this life that is not what it is in contrast to what it is not; one can only see the light in the dark, know happiness after sadness, and be smart through accepting one is dumb (doesn’t know everything). That is the tragic nature of the human psyche where the good exists only with the bad, and it is why ignorance is bliss. By turning a blind eye to the world, you do not need to accept the harsh realities of the world, face the mediocracy of the masses, or deal with anything uncomfortable. However, nor are you able to appreciate anything worthwhile that the world has to offer. Ignorance may be bliss, but on the flip side, it is a terrible curse, a curse that human beings have been uniquely (well, to the largest extent) able to free themselves of by looking backwards, inwards, forwards, and in any direction, in an effort to perpetually learn and advance.
I think you are intelligent, however not because you enjoy shakespeare or breezed through high school (that hardly constitutes intelligence), but because you know who you are, what you like, what you WANT, and what you lack. After knowing this, by not turning that bind eye and by shedding the veil of ignorance, you will advance. You don’t need to pretend to like what you don’t to get what you want. Intelligence is working and thinking, and ultimately living life in a way where you can have your cake and eat it too. Maybe, just maybe you can be happier than you can even imagine?

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Rodrack (0) (@Rodrack) 6 years, 7 months ago ago

I agree with you, ignorance and low intelligence usually offer easy happiness. Being able to keep your mind off grim thoughts as the apparent absurdity of life and the terrible injustice of the world and instead remain distracted with mainstream entertainment does indeed seem like a blessing at first. However, my experience has showed my a couple of things about happiness and intelligence.

I too consider myself a highly intelligent person (and agree with you that one’s own intelligence should only be discussed in particular contexts). I can easily relate to your story; for most of my life I felt alienated from those around me and often submerged myself in defeating thoughts. I was anti-social and unpopular in school and my adolescence received me with one severe depression that lasted almost a year. Like you, I felt and resented the heavy burden of my own intelligence.

However, my last years have been different. I chose to be happy and my intelligence played a key role in this. I got into spirituality and positive psychology. I read dozens of books and hundreds of articles (many on HE) that explain the science and art of happiness. I feel like I have been able to understand some key mechanics of the human mind and unlock a happiness far greater than the somewhat-amusing satisfaction that most people profess as true happiness. I know now that happiness and intelligence are not mutually exclusive. In fact, I believe smart people have access to a bliss that most don’t, but you must work hard to achieve this.

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JustinDanger (41) (@JustinDanger) 6 years, 7 months ago ago

If you do not know how to make yourself happy.

Are you really intelligent?

Are you?

No, not really.

Some are Roses,
Some are Thorns,
Justin Danger

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Almeida (304) (@xetado) 6 years, 7 months ago ago

This is extremely non sense. You might as well consider everyone dumb because we all have moments when we look for happiness and don’t seem to find it. In order to be happy, one must be always looking for new formulas, and it’s okay to get lost sometimes. That won’t make anyone smarter or dumber.

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JustinDanger (41) (@JustinDanger) 6 years, 7 months ago ago

I agree completely.

If you are on the path to a higher level you are going to experience a period of discomfort and struggle.

If you are stagnant at your level you are going to experience a period of dissatisfaction and boredom.

In either case, the path towards happiness is to ascend to the next level.

If you have not achieved the next level it is because you have not acquired the necessary self-mastery and intelligence to do so.

To sit around and complain that you are “too intelligent” is a degenerate mindset.

You are not intelligent enough, that is your problem.

Strive ever higher.

Some are Roses,
Some are Thorns,
Justin Danger

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Almeida (304) (@xetado) 6 years, 7 months ago ago

How the fuck you completely agree? You just talked about intelligence as an inate attribute, and said that one is not intelligent if does not know how to make oneself happy. Happiness is just happiness, it’s simple, not complex. There are no “levels”, you just invented that yourself. By the way, stating that I’m just not at your “intelligence level” and thus can’t understand your point is just falacious.

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JustinDanger (41) (@JustinDanger) 6 years, 7 months ago ago

I do not think intelligence is an innate attribute.

It is anything but innate.

Anyone can become more intelligent or less intelligent depending on their habits.

I definitely did not invent the idea of levels.

Some are Roses,
Some are Thorns,
Justin Danger

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landisian (7) (@landisian) 6 years, 6 months ago ago

It’s both. If we look at theology to make scence of it god said eat from the tree of life and not from the tree of knowledge of good and evil. We didn’t listen and know we have a much higher intelligence. And we all know better. All the other animals seen how we were living and said Fuck that we don’t want to know better, so they left that tree alone. But who knows right.

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Mark (26) (@MarcvsMaximvs) 6 years, 6 months ago ago

I don’t remember who said this, or if I quote correctly, but I think it applies here: ”If you ever think you are not adequate and life sucks, first make sure you are not just surrounded by assholes.” Something in those lines, anyway…you get the point.
There is a big chance that you are an intelligent individual surrounded by relatively unintelligent undividuals, as those are the majority.
You are never meant to conform with them. Because if every intelligent person did this, intelligence would be meaningless.

Long story short, I think your parents and teachers were right. Don’t throw away this gift you’ve been given.

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LVX (297) (@Vovinawol) 6 years, 6 months ago ago

We choose what the grail (graal) serves.

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