Is fluoride really that bad for you?

evolve (@evolve) 8 years, 8 months ago

Considering its in our toothpaste and drinking water, I’ve heard it’s bad for your health, but good for our teeth. What exactly is so bad about it? Sounds like a conspiracy to me.

April 2, 2013 at 11:41 am
Marie (2,051) (@ARCANUS) 8 years, 8 months ago ago

No idea. I’d like to know how it works. Only thing is after fluoride (in toothpaste, but also tablets for kids, at least in my case growing up) it seems our teeth – compared to the previous generation – are strengthened. It seems that way from where I’m standing. But I can imagine it’s bad to drink it.

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Anonymous (44) (@) 8 years, 8 months ago ago

yes.

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Anonymous (68) (@) 8 years, 8 months ago ago

@evolve, everything ‘unnatural’ has sopme unknown effects on your body.

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evolve (144) (@evolve) 8 years, 8 months ago ago

@bono95zg, but a lot of folks make it seem fluoride specifically does a lot of harm. Especially towards our pineal gland. Is it BS?

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Country Man (12) (@420chief) 8 years, 8 months ago ago

this is not bs go to google and look at images of the pineal gland effected by fluoride

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Sara111 (49) (@sarad) 8 years, 8 months ago ago

Lowers IQ and calcifies the pineal gland.

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Adam (118) (@moonglade) 8 years, 8 months ago ago

@evolve, I think there was a harvard study proving that it lowers IQ. I’ll try to find it for ya.

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Anonymous (86) (@) 8 years, 8 months ago ago

@moonglade, there’s a difference between recommended levels and toxic levels.

High Existence really needs to sort its science out.

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Adam (118) (@moonglade) 8 years, 8 months ago ago

@conpassione, I still have yet to find the article that I mentioned if you could shed some light on the topic that’d be great. All I’ve found is that it might have an affect on children’s cognitive development.

Also humans drink a shit ton of water it wouldn’t surprise me if people were getting toxic amounts.

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Anonymous (2,833) (@) 8 years, 8 months ago ago

Is nitrogen bad for you?
Is carbon bad for you?
How about oxygen?

Is water bad for you? Carbs? Oils? Strawberries?

Its an ambiguous question. Some people link the ‘fluorine‘ containing molecules in some pharmaceuticals with fluoride in our drinking water. They have extremely different properties – one being an anion and the other being uncharged.

Further nobody has explained, to me, why fluoride is so toxic in comparison to say, chloride (Cl-) which is of course, in your table salt.

There is a HUGE difference between correlation and causation which MANY people seem to totally ignore. The study in china where Fluoride levels were CORRELATED with IQ drop is probably not the only thing different between the two cities. SO many factors would have to be weighed in…

Fluoride levels are CORRELATED with decrease in IQ.
Umbrellas are CORRELATED with rain.

That does not mean that umbrellas CAUSE rain.

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Alex (345) (@staylucky) 8 years, 8 months ago ago

@ijesuschrist, “Umbrellas are CORRELATED with rain.

That does not mean that umbrellas CAUSE rain.”

Then why do people always have umbrellas when it rains?

HA! The defense rests, your honour.

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Anonymous (2,833) (@) 8 years, 8 months ago ago

@staylucky, please be joking

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Anonymous (86) (@) 8 years, 8 months ago ago

@moonglade, the study showed negative effects associated with high (toxic) levels of fluoride compared to lower (non-toxic) levels. Most cases of toxicity in the US occur when people actually ingest things like toothpaste.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3491930/table/t1/

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Alex (345) (@staylucky) 8 years, 8 months ago ago

@ijesuschrist, It’s not as funny when I have to explain myself.

In hindsight, it probably just wasn’t that funny.

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evolve (144) (@evolve) 8 years, 8 months ago ago

Thank you everyone for their replies, still skeptical though. I suppose peome make it more bad than it really is?

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DaJetPlane (994)M (@lytning91) 8 years, 8 months ago ago

The real question behind all of this is that, given @ijesuschrist ‘s argument that correlation and causation are different (which is true), why would there be a need for interjection of fluoride into water? The ambiguity of asking whether fluoride is bad for you would go twofold with asking the question “is fluoride GOOD for you?”

If the truth remained ambiguous on both sides, then I’d only be left to question the motives behind why our government would put an additive in the water which had a seemingly purposeless interaction with the treatment process.

Note that I’m not actually informed enough to fully understand why fluoride helps or harms us, outside of general knowledge regarding it’s “strengthening of teeth” and alternative “lowering of IQ.”

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Anonymous (134) (@) 8 years, 8 months ago ago

@staylucky, and along that umbrella line… I’m not saying i’m batman, i’m just saying that no one has ever seen Batman and i together ;)

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Thunderfeet (161) (@thunderfeet) 8 years, 8 months ago ago

Fluoride itself isn’t bad, there is small amounts of natural fluoride in natural water, the thing is the amount added to our water systems is way more than is necessary. The main issue I have with fluoridating the water supply is that the government gives the people no choice, Doctors cannot force you to take any sort of medication unless you are a danger to others or yourself but apparently dentists can. Also on the back of most toothpaste tubes it says if you swallow more than a certain amount to call poison control, so if toothpaste is harmful to ingest then wouldn’t drink water with the same stuff be just as bad?
I use fluoride free toothpaste and I can say I have seen noticeable changes in my mood and level of thinking. I have an easier time articulating my idea’s and my vocabulary has expanded, not because I’m actively working on expanding it but because I’m using the bigger words from books I’m reading with out thinking about them. Its like they’ve always been there but I just couldn’t grasp them e.g. yesterday at Easter dinner with my family I said something, I can’t remember what it was now. what I said made perfect sense to me but after I said it everyone else had a look of bewilderment upon there faces because they didn’t understand. Only then did I realize how confusing the words I used would be to an average individual. Yes I know I’m rambling, like I said I’m articulating my thoughts better. Also I seem a lot less susceptible to bullshit, like I understand what’s going on around me more and when some when is spewing out crap I call them on it instead of just going along with it so I don’t cause trouble.

I have no real proof it was the switch in toothpaste that has brought about these changes, there are probably a ton of other variables and I didn’t to any sort of test or control to measure it but either way I am noticing changes and they are positive.

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Heed them, HEthen (91) (@heedthem) 8 years, 8 months ago ago

@lytning91, There is not just “fluoride in our water”, the people in this have been mistaken so far. NEW YORK CITY and SOME other places specifically (but most notoriously NYC) started putting fluoride in their water semi-recently because they decided it was a healthy move on their part. Their mayor has a lot of initiative in city health – they put a restriction on the amount of soda one container can contain that is sold to customers (16 oz.)

While this does not equate other possible ulterior motives – politicians are always being lobbied and donated to by organizations – it was appear as if in this particular case, it follows the trend of concern for general health conditions improving in the city. It has changed a lot. People don’t randomly pee on walls anymore and hipsters live in Harlem.

I still personally think all manufactured and process-derived ingredients are not meant for benevolent cause. ALL KINDS of toxic chemicals reside in almost every single hygiene product we use. People need to realize this, seriously. It is not “fluoride is bad for you”, “sulfates are bad for you”, “lead is bad for you”, etc etc. It’s, “chemically derived agents that use toxins as part of the manufacturing will reside in the product, and the product can be absorbed through any holes in your body, i.e. your pores, your eyes, your mouth, your earths, anything that touches you really, so the FDA makes us use a % cap”

EDIT: And as a sidenote, chemicals used to process and manufacture your item so it can be sold to you the way it is does NOT by law require to be listed as an ingredient because it technically isn’t. Fully consider what this implies.

For example, the pesticides on non-organics are not required to be removed; they literally sell us pesticide-covered produce. That’s why grandma always told you to wash off your apples.

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Heed them, HEthen (91) (@heedthem) 8 years, 8 months ago ago

Sorry, didn’t mean to be targeting that novel of a comment just to you, it meant to add to the entire discussion

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DaJetPlane (994)M (@lytning91) 8 years, 8 months ago ago

No, this is the more appropriate comment to be made. I was simply drawing up a theory based on the ambiguity principle that was listed before.

I’m quite aware of how many chemicals reside in us daily and how polluted we have made our environment, as well as how exhaustive our water treatment processes are, so I’d HAVE to imagine some legitimate reason for the introduction of fluoride.

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Adam (118) (@moonglade) 8 years, 8 months ago ago

@conpassione, I see I assumed that since flourine in toothpaste was bad flourine in water was bad.

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Anonymous (86) (@) 8 years, 8 months ago ago

@moonglade, fluoride isn’t the same thing as fluorine. Concentrations of fluoride are much higher in many toothpastes, so that’s why it’s an issue when someone swallows too much of it.

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Joe (10) (@bluescream) 8 years, 8 months ago ago

@evolve, Calcium fluoride or sodium fluoride? One is naturally occurring the other is a by product from toxic waste.

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