Perpetual Deja Vu

 Alex Eastman (@alex)6 years, 4 months ago

I’m going to try my best to describe this but I don’t really know how.

Lately, I’ve been living in a state of perpetual Deja Vu. I feel like I am one fraction of a moment ahead in time, but at the same time following a set path. Its as if I was reading a book I have already read, i know what is coming up, at least vaguely.
Its as if I am stuck in a set path that I’ve seen a few times before…

I predict things a moment before they happen but not enough to be significant to anyone except me. Like a vague memory of what is about to happen in a movie i seen years ago….

Anyone know what to think about this? It has been bothering me for some time. Frankly, it is freaking me out.

May 27, 2013 at 8:45 pm
secretagentpeter (81) (@secretagentpeter) 6 years, 3 months ago ago

@crossingtheeventhorizon, I noticed you mentioned OOBE’s and kundalini meditation
I’m really interesting in these things can you comment me some links or advice to do these things?… Your the first person I’ve seen here talk about having an OOBE and I really wanna experience it…

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Mckhrtmn1987 (60)C (@mhartman1987) 6 years, 3 months ago ago

http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/2011/09/15/time-on-the-brain-how-you-are-always-living-in-the-past-and-other-quirks-of-perception/

”The fun thing about neuroscience is that you can do the experiments on yourself. David Eagleman of the Baylor College of Medicine proceeded to treat us as his test subjects. By means of several visual illusions, he demonstrated that we are all living in the past: Our consciousness lags 80 milliseconds behind actual events. “When you think an event occurs it has already happened,” Eagleman said.

In one of these illusions, the flash-lag effect, a light flashes when an object moves past it, but we don’t see the two as coincident; there appears to be a slight offset between them. By varying the parameters of the experiment, Eagleman showed that this occurs because the brain tries to reconstruct events retroactively and occasionally gets it wrong. The reason, he suggested, is that our brains seek to create a cohesive picture of the world from stimuli that arrive at a range of times. If you touch your toe and nose at the same time, you feel them at the same time, even though the signal from your nose reaches your brain first. You hear and see a hand clap at the same time, even though auditory processing is faster than visual processing. Our brains also paper over gaps in information, such as eyeblinks. “Your consciousness goes through all the trouble to synchronize things,” Eagleman said. But that means the slowest signal sets the pace.

The cost of hiding the logistical details of perception is that we are always a beat behind. The brain must strike a balance. Cognitive psychologist Alex Holcombe at Sydney has some clever demonstrations showing that certain forms of motion perception take a second or longer to register, and our brains clearly can’t wait that long. Our view of the world takes shape as we watch it.

The 80-millisecond rule plays all sorts of perceptual tricks on us. As long as a hand-clapper is less than 30 meters away, you hear and see the clap happen together. But beyond this distance, the sound arrives more than 80 milliseconds later than the light, and the brain no longer matches sight and sound. What is weird is that the transition is abrupt: by taking a single step away from you, the hand-clapper goes from in sync to out of sync. Similarly, as long as a TV or film soundtrack is synchronized within 80 milliseconds, you won’t notice any lag, but if the delay gets any longer, the two abruptly and maddeningly become disjointed. Events that take place faster than 80 milliseconds fly under the radar of consciousness. A batter swings at a ball before being aware that the pitcher has even throw it.

The cohesiveness of consciousness is essential to our judgments about cause and effect—and, therefore, to our sense of self. In one particularly sneaky experiment, Eagleman and his team asked volunteers to press a button to make a light blink—with a slight delay. After 10 or so presses, people cottoned onto the delay and began to see the blink happen as soon as they pressed the button. Then the experimenters reduced the delay, and people reported that the blink happened before they pressed the button.”

Consciousness, or rather the I-me-mine reflexive, story-telling mind, lags behind reality. Perhaps intuitively, holistically you ‘know’ already what is happening or has happened, even before the verbal-mental you has ‘explained/confirmed/interpretated/labelled it for you, and that is why you get the feeling of familiarity, the sense of deja-vu-ness…

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Fleabus (1) (@Fleabus) 6 years, 3 months ago ago

@mhartman1987, I’ve always loved this concept. Everything takes place in your brain, adding supernatural qualities to Deja-vu or dreams is making assumptions based on no logical reason.

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Alex Eastman (71) (@alex) 6 years, 3 months ago ago

@blankey, Yes, but to a lesser degree. I’ve realized that half of the time it happens, it can be explained away as my mind picking up on things subconsciously then it doesn’t tell my consciousness where it got the info from, haha. Still, some spooky things happen though.
@stuman1, Yes, I have. Lol.

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brabble (0) (@brabble) 6 years, 3 months ago ago

all is according to plan

the year of eternal return has begun

mwhahaha

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anonymity (3) (@anonymity) 6 years ago ago

(NOTE: This is going to be a long post.)

Even today we have a primitive understanding of the mind and nervous system. The electro-chemical balance within the body resembles the complexities of the universe. Even today we cannot graph an estimated average of nerves within the nervous system.

I am now four and a half years into my experiences of deja vu. They occur in the amount of at least one a month. It is also a common symptom of schizophrenia of which I do have a mild case of. The disorder does not impare me too much, I am still able to hold a part time job and go to college full time.

My experience should be more of a warning to anyone who is currently experiencing long term deja vu.

Four and a half years ago i received two irregular dreams. The first held many outlandish, odd statements about my life with my voice narrating.

The second felt like I was in a dream for three months. When I awoke from that dream I felt older and different. After the second dream my prolonge deja vu experience began. I had experienced deja vu before but this time I had partial memory of the dreams that the deja vu had come from. This fact, my memory of the endings of these two( and an one anomaly months prior), would be my downfall.

I began trying to predict how this experience would end, since the ending part of these dreams were still prominent in my mind. Worse I began trying to create a certain memory since it had incentive (personal incentive). If you are following the story you can imagine the ending. The path lead to my ruination. Yes I was smoking weed at the time, prolificly I might add. And I had my first experience with hallucinogens a month or so before (salvia). However these deja vu have occurred with consistentcy now that I’ve sobered.

The instances were just like the firsts posts description. Watching a movie for the second time after years. This is the feeling you should keep guarded when experiencing this…

After years of thought over why and how I had reach my state of affairs, I was left with only one plausible conclusion. If you’ve read this far you should humor me once more.

There is and were no explanations for these deja vu events. A psychologist would say its a misperception, and artificial placement of myself. However, I have never been lead astray by my memories. There was one “clip”, the first deja vu from this mess that…when I dreamed about it, it touched me emotionally. So much that I even talked to myself about it when I woke suddenly that night. Its far to personal to share with you but this “clip” came from my anomaly dream. The only deja vu that occurred long before the incident and reoccurred during the beginning of the event…

With the option of misperception off the table I was left with one final possibility, after assuming many others sadly.

My last belief is that what is and did happen to me was something beyond science. No one has the ability to see into the future.

This lead me to the belief that I had a soul, and with a soul, the belief that I will (at least) have another life. (I came to this realization after certain assurance of atheism.) This also lead me to a conclusion that there is life that carries souls in and out of existence. Whether they are gods I neither worry nor care.

Believe what you want. But nothing has ever brought me more peace than this understanding. It is the reason I am still able to live…

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Myra (1) (@Myra) 5 years, 11 months ago ago

@anonymity,

to me it looks like you are activating your witness / observing self.
I would name it flow, instead of deja vu :-). It may be that your deja vu is a kind of prediction of what is going to happen, not a re-living. So, your mind is a good predictor, enjoy it.

But it looks like you are not willing to consciously change anything of this flow. Perhaps allowing yourself new experiences and making conscious decisions will change how you feel. To be in the flow is not like letting go into the water, abandoning into the river. That is one perspective. I see it more like a conscious option. You can change the flow, adding your own flavour to the world. Of course we are all one, interconnected, and so what? Are you going to do something new? For sure, not the mind control is the key to have a better future.

As I see it, it is ok to think like 3 months you were dreaming. You may have been in some people’s story (your partner?). Or your own dream. As during this tranformative process you don’t have an ego, you can easily adapt to anything, and live in different stories. Perhaps now it’s time to choose your own self, your own values?

You say -No one has the ability to see into the future –
My comment – It is not the future that you are seeing, it is the present moment, seen from the past :-). I mean those 100 miliseconds between pure awareness/perception and the cognitive processing.
It looks like future for you, because you feel that you are not here-now. If you will allow yourself to be here-now, the witness=observer=you will be in the present moment, and will be able to observe the formation of the thoughts, and will be able to consciously select what to do with that. You can’t control your thoughts, but you can control what you eat, read, watch, act.
Looks like righ now you act thinking you comply to a kind of supernatural power or flow, when it may be that you are just creating the future right now, in the present moment, but based on your past ideas and patterns, instead of consciously selecting what you want to experience.

You say – This lead me to the belief that I had a soul, and with a soul, the belief that I will (at least) have another life. (I came to this realization after certain assurance of atheism.) This also lead me to a conclusion that there is life that carries souls in and out of existence. Whether they are gods I neither worry nor care.
My comment- it looks like you already know the way out :-) it may be that we are all part of one soul, or one consciousness. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panpsychism. But who knows? It is ok not to have answers. I think we are all water, for sure :-)

Have you seen the waking up or bipolar videos on you tube?

How is this relating to your experience? :-)

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JonH (1,139)C (@IJesusChrist) 5 years, 11 months ago ago

@myra, You’re a big floppy penis

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bz (1) (@bunglenzippy) 5 years, 11 months ago ago

Time is not as fixed as we assume, and turns out to be circular, not linear!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Db5VBEXKAE

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anonymity (3) (@anonymity) 5 years, 11 months ago ago

@myra, I’ve hear of this belief. I’m pretty sure its on the first page of this blog too. And I’m certain its possible. Some of the problem during my fallout was I was thinking certain moments were deja vu’s when they weren’t. I was on drugs most of the time, and that didn’t help.

Believe me I would not want to believe this if I could. I don’t go saying things I normally don’t believe.

Like I said the main reason I believe this is because of one night I awoke with images from a dream.

I did not think much of the dream at the time besides of the fact of how happy the concept made me. However, when reliving it months later I was more frightened by it than pleased. It was outside of the original concept and seemed far too perfect to be real. And that is where my psychosis started.

As far as the mania goes. For me (I am usually calm) there was a bit of mania. Nothing like the videos on YouTube. My hallucinations worked by feeding me paranoia through background information. Like conversations of people I was near or walking by. The hallucinations would try to illicit a reaction from me, which would lead to a superfluous image of bipolar disorder. When really, its worse.

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LaCash (0) (@LaCash) 4 years, 2 months ago ago

I had the same thing happen to me, it lasted for at least  three months. It was mind boggling. This is the first time I’ve heard of anyone else experiencing it. I would love to know how and why it happens. My brother said it sounded like some kind of psychosis. I wasn’t sure if I was crazy or gifted. I’m sure there is a logical explanation but I think it is an extreme 6th sense, or heightened sense of future events. That’s all I can think of. Nice to know it’s not just me. ~LeeAnn 

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Gadgirl1 (0) (@Gadgirl1) 3 years, 5 months ago ago

I have been having this constantly 24/7 even in my dreams for 6 months now. It’s not were I can predict what’s going to happen next it just feels like everything has been done at some point before and I don’t know when. I have been diagnosed with anxiety depresonilstion and Derelization. 

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