Protect a stranger's blissful ignorance, or drag them into a harsher reality?

PhenixRoy (@untiltheend) 7 years, 10 months ago

The scene I’m about to describe happened in a show I was recently watching, while it had little to do with the actual plot, besides emphasize a small point, I haven’t quite been able to get it out of my mind. I have yet to reach my own conclusion about it, so I ask for yours.
Imagine this,
You are a nurse working in the intensive care unit of a hospital. While you are changing the sheets of a recently vacated room, a priest walks in asking for the young girl who had been being treated in there. It is well know the priest has been having a lot of problems lately and it is very likely he has been questioning his faith. The girl in question had been in a coma, with negligible brain activity and almost no responses. You inform the priest that the girl just woke up, was completely fine and asked for a soda. After your answer, the priest beams with pride, and his voice is full of hope and faith as he informs you that just this morning, his congregation prayed for the girl, asking God to help her. However, you know that the girl woke up yesterday, before the priest had led his prayers.

Do you tell him that his pleas to God had nothing to do with it, knowing it could very well damage the faith he has devoted his life to, or let him live on with his false hope/faith?

July 14, 2014 at 1:47 am
Marlon (97) (@shoeopener) 7 years, 10 months ago ago

A true faithful priest won’t use comparison to judge people and with the strongest faith in life and people everyone is trying to reach, nothing is going to seem as harsh momentarily.

Faith doesn’t protect people from their egos, it humbles them. A thing atheists cannot seem to comprehend.

Your two options are potentially detrimental, I suggest getting into the depth of reality.

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PhenixRoy (33) (@untiltheend) 7 years, 10 months ago ago

@shoeopener I understand that faith humbles, I have faith in God and believe with my whole heart. However, I do not believe that you need to believe in God to understand that or to have faith. For God is not the only thing you can have faith in.
As for “getting in touch with reality”, the situation was from a TV show. Therefore not reality. The Leftovers was the show to be exact, I highly recommend it.
Now. Back to my actual point, which does not question God, atheism, or faith. I understand I could have worded it better, I do not mean to call the priest ignorant in his faith. Just that he believes his prayers helped the girl, when you (as the nurse) know that the girl had regained consciousness before his congregation’s prayer. I simply want to know, regardless of spiritual beliefs, would you as the nurse, tell him she awoke before his prayers, or let him go on thinking they helped.
As a side note to your “a truly faithful priest” comment, I will repeat that his was questioning his faith. And in the TV show, it affected him greatly to hear that she had woken up the day before.

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Marlon (97) (@shoeopener) 7 years, 10 months ago ago

Prayer mostly helps the one who prays because it’s meditative. That’s what I think having faith means. A drive. It doesn’t have to do with lack of intelligence and believing in miracles. I also don’t see anything harsh, like someone’s going to hurt the priest’s feelings when a girl was the real victim in this case so his troubles are really less important.

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JonH (1,139)C (@IJesusChrist) 7 years, 10 months ago ago

In this case, no. You don’t do this. You don’t deny people. You don’t contradict people. You don’t pressure people – this is only ends in conflict and argumentation. If you want to point people to a more objective perspective, or at least more appropriate, you need to do it in very small steps.

In this case, a Priest, who has likely devoted his entire life to God, and who has a majority of his brain holding up a foundation of this belief, isn’t going to hear what you say if it’s in contrast to his belief.

In such a scenario, it would be best to neither deny him, nor agree with him.

“Ah, praise God, for our congregation has saved this young girl.”
“That could be the case, and she will thank you for the prayers. She did rise yesterday though.”

And leave it at that. To say something like “No, she rose yesterday.” Will only hurt the Priest, and not make him question.

The brain is not purely logical. I think human history is enough to show this.

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PhenixRoy (33) (@untiltheend) 7 years, 10 months ago ago

@IJesusChrist You bring up a really good point, that contradicting and pressuring people leads to conflict.
The reason I posted this was because I was very conflicted as to what my reaction would be if I were presented with the situation, it went against my morals not only to hurt the priest, or question him, but also to not bring the truth to him. Your suggested response could bring the truth to him in a way that was much less harmful. The brain isn’t purely logical, as I was attempting (and obviously not succeeding with) to be when analyzing this situation.

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Daniel Diaz (5) (@danieldiaz1230) 7 years, 10 months ago ago

@untiltheend I have seen this show and know exactly what your talking about, because in that scene you can tell that the priest was really torn when he found out that she woke up before his prayers. I took an Asian religion class last spring and I learn about a lot about Buddhism. One practice that the Buddha used was silence. When he would talk to someone and knew that if he told that person something that would hurt them, then he would go silent. now relating that to the scene of the show; in that moment if the nurse didn’t say anything than it would be a win-win situation. The girl would still be out of the comma and the priest wouldn’t have known other wise. silence is sometimes the best answer.

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PhenixRoy (33) (@untiltheend) 7 years, 10 months ago ago

I’ve studied Buddhism, and that thought was one of the main things that fueled my confusion over how I would act. It seems the best path to take in this situation.

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Blah (363) (@tentninja) 7 years, 10 months ago ago

If they don’t ask questions… leave them in ignorance.

If they ask questions, answer them honestly in a hope that it may enlighten them of their ignorance.

But that only works when they ask (and if you have mastered communication :P haha)

If you answer questions they didn’t ask, they will see you as ‘egotistical’ rather than intelligent.

Which is obviously their bad :)

God said he put a vail over the none believers faces which made them deaf dumb and blind…

So i think if you are religious, its best to follow my advice :D

But i am not god, so feel free to not listen to me at all :D

but you did ask the question ;)

so maybe you will like my advice?? :P

Hope you understand :)

PEACE <3

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NacroxNicke! (3) (@nacrox) 7 years, 10 months ago ago

I like your advice, it’s better to answer what they ask and nothing more. Most of the time speaking much about deep things means spitting things to people that doesn’t want to ear (and that’s fine because the seek of personal growth starts by oneself).

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Blah (363) (@tentninja) 7 years, 10 months ago ago

got it in one brotato chip :D

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Marlon (97) (@shoeopener) 7 years, 10 months ago ago

Worry is spiritual short sight. Its cure is intelligent faith. – Paul Brunto

I think what discussions about this topic fail to address is the forgiveness of ignorance because certainly, no one is free from being uninformed about something. No one.

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NacroxNicke! (3) (@nacrox) 7 years, 10 months ago ago

You don’t have to say everything you know. You don’t have to prove other people wrong, or proving yourself correct.

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Marlon (97) (@shoeopener) 7 years, 10 months ago ago

You’re wrong. You have to know why you’re right.

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Anonymous (328) (@) 7 years, 10 months ago ago

“It is well know the priest has been having a lot of problems lately and it is very likely he has been questioning his faith”

How so? These situations are very narrow… Nonetheless here comes my oh so WISDOMY NARROW ASSUMPTION: You just missed your opportunity to have helped someone. The truth will probably get him out of that rut, in which he will probably be back in shortly after that temporary boost. He knows it. It’s like a drug.

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Ray (4) (@brainofmorbius) 7 years, 10 months ago ago

Apparently you haven’t heard of retrocausality in the research being done on distant healing?

Many extensive experiments have shown that targeting healing towards an individual can work backwards into the past…

I won’t go into the details but you can find reference to these experiments in many books.

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PhenixRoy (33) (@untiltheend) 7 years, 10 months ago ago

That’s a really interesting thought. I’ve read into a lot of theories explaining time as not being a straight line, so this is definitely something I want to look into more.

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Ray (4) (@brainofmorbius) 7 years, 10 months ago ago

Dean Radin has done alot of this research (mostly with effects just a few seconds into the past – but which are also capabilities they documented as far down in the animal kingdom as to the level of flatworms…). Look up his books on Amazon. Other accounts go back months or more. One intriguing one for example is detailed in “Suddenly Psychic” by Maureen Caudill.

Time is really a very strange thing indeed…

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AllysonDayle (3) (@allysondayle) 7 years, 10 months ago ago

I think every one is entitled to to their own faith no matter how ridiculously unrealistic it may seem to me.

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aashu (0) (@aashu) 7 years, 10 months ago ago

hello

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PhenixRoy (33) (@untiltheend) 7 years, 10 months ago ago

Hi :)

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