Transit of Venus

Anonymous (@) 9 years, 7 months ago

For those who aren’t aware, or may have forgot, Venus is making it’s transit in front of the sun right now. If you don’t have a way of viewing it you can check it out at this link, a live feed from the Mauna Kea observatory in Hawaii. This is a twice in a lifetime event for us, but this will be the last time until 2117! CHECK IT OUT

http://sunearthday.nasa.gov/webcasts/nasaedge/

June 5, 2012 at 3:18 pm
Anonymous (170) (@) 9 years, 7 months ago ago

@smalls, thanks for the link. Do you know if it will be visible in the midwest.

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DaJetPlane (994)M (@lytning91) 9 years, 7 months ago ago

I’m confused on this. The live stream is really like chatty and uninformative as a result. What am I looking at?

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Anonymous (194) (@) 9 years, 7 months ago ago

@imhotep, Pretty sure it’s visible anywhere the sun is shining right now, I’m in Minnesota and it will be visible until sundown if you have the right viewing equipment, ie #14 welder’s glasses, a telescope with a solar filter or a pinhole projector. When the webcast first started they were exclusively showing the feed, now they keep cutting in and out to talking to the different scientists at the observatory

DISCLAIMER: DO NOT STARE AT THE SUN

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Anonymous (194) (@) 9 years, 7 months ago ago

@lytning91, I’ve been in and out so I haven’t seen all of it but I know for a while they were doing some online QnA and basic interviews but I didn’t hear what they were talking about. Unlike in MN where it will only be visible for about 3 and a half hours, that feed is from Hawaii and they have I think the full 7 hours or so to view it so I’m sure they’re trying to come up with some filler. Right now they are having a little science lesson on it. It’s actually pretty informative right now.

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Anonymous (194) (@) 9 years, 7 months ago ago

I think it’s just an amazing moment for provoking thought, this only happens in pairs 8 years apart, every 105 years or so. The history behind it, the scientists hundreds of years ago that used this event to calculate the distance of the Earth from the sun (an Astronomical Unit), the voyages that were undertaken in an attempt to view this phenomena from different places of the Earth. Then just the ability, from our vantage point, to be able to see Venus relative to the size of the Sun is breathtaking, being that Venus is roughly the same size as Earth. Gives you somewhat of an idea of the enormity of our life-giving star.

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K (7) (@FLIP) 9 years, 7 months ago ago

You can not look at it directly but you can make your own device to see it. Most people don’t have telescopes so if you don’t you can use binoculars.
Trace binocular’s large sided lenses on a piece of cardboard and trace them.
Cut out the two circles and attach the cardboard piece to your binoculars, this creates shade so use as large a piece as you can.
Now you have binoculars with a large cardboard shield around it.
Go outside and cover one large lens and angle the binoculars until you get a small circle of light on the ground/or more cardboard coming from the eye piece, that is the sun.
Once you have found the sun you can use the focus to make the image sharper and you will see a small dot in it, that is venus.
This is basically a pinhole projection, and the farther you put the binoculars from the ground or cardboard your projecting onto the larger the image will be.
It’s really easy took me about ten minutes to make.

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DaJetPlane (994)M (@lytning91) 9 years, 7 months ago ago

@smalls, thanks man. I think it is pretty freaking awesome.

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Jordan (22) (@humanexplorer) 9 years, 7 months ago ago

Ustream also is doing some pretty good live coverage. This is literally what you would see through a solar telescope, and without changing the color of the sun.

http://www.ustream.tv/TransitofVenus

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Anonymous (194) (@) 9 years, 7 months ago ago

I’ve been telling everybody I come across for about a week now to check this out any way they can. Even if it’s something that you may not find interesting right now, this is the last chance that most everybody that is alive right now will ever have to see this event.

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DaJetPlane (994)M (@lytning91) 9 years, 7 months ago ago

@smalls, be careful what you say…

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Anonymous (194) (@) 9 years, 7 months ago ago

@lytning91, I gave an edit, changed it to most everybody, certainly most who are old enough to appreciate it right now. Barring some amazing medical breakthrough I’m not planning on being around in 2117. (I’d be 131)

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DaJetPlane (994)M (@lytning91) 9 years, 7 months ago ago

@smalls, try to imagine how your grandmother feels about the technology that we have around today compared to when she was a kid. Now think about us…think about how much time it took for these changes…we might be living longer than either of us imagine. That, or dead.

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cosmicloner (31) (@cosmicloner) 9 years, 7 months ago ago

Right as the transit began, my wife and I began fighting and it was basically about Love and whatnot. We made up, resolved the fight, and strengthened our love just as Venus is now nearing the end of it’s transit. That’s awesome!! :D

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Anonymous (194) (@) 9 years, 7 months ago ago

click that link in the original post and you can catch the last glimpse of Venus in front of the sun for the next 105 years. Roughly 10 minutes left

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