Why is intelligence often confused with knowledge?

Daniel Gonçalves (@Daniel-Goncalves) 8 years, 1 month ago

I can’t help but notice the misconceptions surrounding thse two concepts: Intelligence and knowledge.

I don’t consider myself an intelligent person. I’m just not that kind of guy who solves a complex math problem, or even finds different solutions to a single common problem. I actually despise maths and logical/abstract thinking. I’m all about absorving information and knowledge of the world that surrounds me. For example, I actually prefer reading theories and hypothesis rather than aplying the laws to a mathematical context. I’m all about literature, science, history, philosophy and music. Just don’t get me into aplying the science: I’m horrible at it.

People tend to call me intelligent whenever I answer all the questions correctly while watching Who wants to be a millionaire, or while discussing something at college. I actually find it very offensive, because I know I’m not those so-called geeks who are only capable of logical thinking and leave the critical thinking behind.

I think I am a person with a lot of knowledge however I am by no means Intelligent.

What do you think about this? Is there really misconception of the word Intelligent in society?

October 28, 2013 at 3:33 pm
Sandy (115) (@sandman) 8 years, 1 month ago ago

I think it’s a bit of a semantics issue. Other things come up like this, for instance, a very good working memory can make someone particularly good at solving certain types of problems, and that makes them seem “insightful” or creative, when actually they’re just good at parsing a lot of data.

The answer is that intelligence is multifaceted, and having a good storehouse of knowledge (as you do) is useful. An example that may highlight the difference as you suggest, is someone like “Rain Man” Kim Peek, the savant who amassed a Library of Congress sized amount of data, but wasn’t particularly intelligent.

For most people, though, intelligence is a mix of knowledge, experience, working memory, creative problem solving, being able to reframe issues, and logical reasoning.

I think one of the most interesting bits of research recently is that praising kids for being smart is not nearly as effective a motivator in the long run as praising them for working hard. So, intelligent or knowledgeable…keep working at it!

http://nymag.com/news/features/27840/

[Hidden]
Daniel Gonçalves (2) (@Daniel-Goncalves) 8 years, 1 month ago ago

@sandman, You do make sense, actually. It’s all in th actual definition ofthe word “intelligence”. So it’s a very wide range of possibilities and this discussion makes no sense. Maybe I should close it, but still, those were my actual thoughts on this whole ordeal.

[Hidden]
hello (113) (@smortlur51) 8 years, 1 month ago ago

@daniel-goncalves, First, I think its more of a relationship between those two things, not so much one over the other. Knowledge will help you to become intelligent, but then again, there are all different kinds of smart. Like you said, you’re really good at some things, but then say at like math or science you’re not that good. Take someone who is knows a lot about lets say literature and is great at dissecting books and identifying subtle themes and such, and then someone who can design a complex engine, which one is smarter?

[Hidden]
deef (4) (@deef) 8 years, 1 month ago ago

I think you are an intelligent Guy with a talent for knowledge…

You can have a lot of knowledge but not intelligent enough to use it wisely… And some dessesions in life havent got anything to do with intelligence… You can be the most intelligent Guy in the world and be a drug addict… While ‘normal’ people Will look at you and say that you are dumb…

All this is relative…

Now it seems that everything humanity knew a 1000 years ago, isnt true… So.. Are we intelligent?

[Hidden]
Daniel Gonçalves (2) (@Daniel-Goncalves) 8 years, 1 month ago ago

@smortlur51, Yeah, I agree. But How can I say this: I love science, I have studied it all my life. However, I’m all about learning those theories and what they mean, rather than transforming it into complex maths. I don’t know if you understand me, it’s kind of dificult to explain it here. But yeah.

I guess I’m more interested in ifnormation, that is why I am studying journalism and loving it.

[Hidden]
hello (113) (@smortlur51) 8 years, 1 month ago ago

@daniel-goncalves, It just means that you are more of a conceptual and abstract thinker, as opposed to someone who is more hands on and applies their knowledge. Take, for example, someone who designs a complex plan for something, and then someone who takes those complex plans and is able to build that complex thing, neither one is smarter than the other, just different ways of thinking

[Hidden]
Daniel Gonçalves (2) (@Daniel-Goncalves) 8 years, 1 month ago ago

@smortlur51, yup, I guess you nailed it. I’m what you can call, the oposite of an engineer. But I still connect that to not being intelligent: considering intelligence as the problem solving ability one has. But yeah, it relies on the semantics of the word.

[Hidden]
Sandy (115) (@sandman) 8 years, 1 month ago ago

@daniel-goncalves, No reason to close the discussion if it stimulates interesting dialogue. I’m just chiming in with how I see things, but it’s just my perspective. I’m glad you brought up the topic – it got me thinking!

[Hidden]
rock_zaozz (20) (@rockzaozz) 8 years, 1 month ago ago

@daniel-goncalves, Knowledge is a product of Intelligence , our educational system reward the people who have a good memory , and they usually do well school , cause that´s what school is all about , just remembering facts , applying formulas and adapt to the system.

“They say he have good grades he must be smart” . Well Maybe , but having good grades is basically remembering facts , So he is not necessary smart .

Memory is just a little part of the intelligence and having a good memory is very useful , but the true knowledge comes from thinking for yourself , being observer , making associations , etc…

Knowledge of just remembering stuff is superficial and not very worthy , but knowledge of understanding what they really are talking about is very useful , And can serve as a root of taking conclusions and more useful knowledge.

[Hidden]
Ty94 (1) (@ty94) 7 years, 6 months ago ago

A general lack of intelligence and our knowledge

[Hidden]
Anonymous (328) (@) 7 years, 5 months ago ago

Humdrum education serves itself.

[Hidden]
Marlon (97) (@shoeopener) 7 years, 5 months ago ago

Critical thinking includes logical thinking. If you feel offended someone called you intelligent you have every damn right to be. Fight for your rights.

[Hidden]
Viewing 11 reply threads
load more