Wowwwww, what do you guys think of this??

Kayla (@kayla147258) 8 years, 9 months ago

After watching tons of videos about dancing in public with your ipod, lol….I came across this

this is fucked up..

February 15, 2013 at 11:16 pm
Nick (554) (@splashartist) 8 years, 9 months ago ago

wtf

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Kayla (68) (@kayla147258) 8 years, 9 months ago ago

pushed and thrown on the ground for dancing…this should have been on the freaking news!!

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Gare (9) (@fossilfuelsrule) 8 years, 9 months ago ago

I would’ve danced my ass off. Too bad not everyone just started dancing. the officers would have to request the riot squad for people dancing. The FOOLS.

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Anonymous (2,654) (@) 8 years, 9 months ago ago

THAT’S UTTERLY RETARDED. What’s a police officer’s job anyway? I’m confused.

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~WP~ (4) (@w0manp0et) 8 years, 9 months ago ago

This story was covered by CBS news and several other major news organizations:

http://abcnews.go.com/US/park-police-investigate-arrests-dancing-jefferson-memorial/story?id=13720498

When you look at more than one source you see that the story is a bit more complex than the youtube video makes it out to be. I Googled ‘arrest dancing Jefferson Memorial.’

Responsible journalism means reporting what actually occurred as opposed to providing social commentary. That’s what CBS news did.

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Manimal (2,998) (@manimal) 8 years, 9 months ago ago

You voted for this.
You pay for this via tax.
You support this by being part of USA.
You encourage this by not doing anything about it.

Don’t act like you’re innocent.

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Grand Kahlib (76) (@kahlib) 8 years, 9 months ago ago

one does not simply dance into Mordor

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InTheMindOfDre (0) (@inthemindofdre) 8 years, 9 months ago ago

Fined? If we aren’t inline with the mind that they forced use to have. Sad

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savmot (135) (@savmot) 8 years, 9 months ago ago

@w0manp0et, That’s not more complicated at all…. They were arrested for dancing. That is it.

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Kayla (68) (@kayla147258) 8 years, 9 months ago ago

@manimal, Realistically, what can one person do about it anymore? You get something like this on the news, people protest, and it dies off the media. For some reason, no one really cares about changing anything anymore and that’s the problem.

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Anonymous (2,833) (@) 8 years, 9 months ago ago

Who ordered that.

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icecream666 (29) (@icecream666) 8 years, 9 months ago ago

@ijesuschrist according to manimal every single adult in the usa did

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Manimal (2,998) (@manimal) 8 years, 9 months ago ago

@kayla147258, You’re not alone. There’s plenty of other people who would like things to change. Protesting is pointless, that shouldn’t even have to be explained. Gotta take action.

Your country needs a revolution. You’re on the brink of a full-blown dystopia if nobody does something soon.

…or you can just sit and watch, until they kill you.

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ASHES (7) (@sinawae) 8 years, 9 months ago ago

@manimal, curious, what country do you live in?

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Anonymous (2,654) (@) 8 years, 9 months ago ago

That’s right. If there isn’t any dance revolution people will die. (?)

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Manimal (2,998) (@manimal) 8 years, 9 months ago ago

@sinawae, Currently residing in Sweden, but how is that the least bit relevant?

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Kevin (536) (@placid) 8 years, 9 months ago ago

All I can think is the harlem shake should take place here.

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ASHES (7) (@sinawae) 8 years, 9 months ago ago

@manimal, umm, sorry??? :P I have read several of your posts and I THINK IT’S INTERESTING WHERE PEOPLE LIVE AND ARE COMING FROM. You have a lot to say about the United States, and I was curious. It’s interesting, not necessarily relevant. ‘Scuse me for going off topic

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Heed them, HEthen (91) (@heedthem) 8 years, 9 months ago ago

@manimal, I don’t necessarily disagree with you, but I have to ask, what can be done?

Can we get a college degree, get inspired, write a book or start gathering like-minded individuals and organize ourselves, speak publicly, and spread the word? Take them to court?
It is always easy to pinpoint the problem – or maybe it’s not, and there are many sides to the question of the problem – either way, it doesn’t matter because it is easy to just say things. Where are you coming from by saying that we are not innocent – are you proposing you’re not innocent as well, or that you are outside of that? Maybe you just don’t care, and are just stating what you think is a fact. I don’t mean ill, these are just questions that could be considered many sides of the same problem from objectivity that I’m interested in.

A certain answer to any of those questions could possibly change an opinion of how they view your answer in a second. Which has to make a person wonder, what is the validity of anything at all? Why were they allowed to arrest them, because the “law” says so? I mean, what does that even mean? That a person read the laws, and decided what they thought it meant in their perspective as things get more technical during the advancement and growth of the nation (and world.)

So really, all we can do is not decide that one certain answer to this problem is right or another is wrong. We have to try to consider the whole, and try to add as many perceived qualities of it as possible.

So, again, what are we supposed to do to change it?
I really actually want to know. Because I’ve considered this a lot, and I don’t know what to do.

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~WP~ (4) (@w0manp0et) 8 years, 9 months ago ago

@savmot,

from Huff Post politics http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/05/30/jefferson-memorial-dancing-arrests_n_868719.html

“U.S. Park Police arrested five people on Saturday at the Jefferson Memorial. Their offense? Dancing.

The dancers were protesting an appeals court ruling handed down last week that the national monuments are places for reflection and contemplation — and that dancing distracted from such an experience.

In 2008, Mary Brooke Oberwetter and a group of friends went to the Jefferson to commemorate the president’s 265th birthday by dancing silently, while listening to music on headphones. Park Police ordered the revelers to disperse and arrested them when they did not.

Oberwetter sued on free speech grounds, but the appeals court ruled last week that her conduct was indeed prohibited “because it stands out as a type of performance, creating its own center of attention and distracting from the atmosphere of solemn commemoration” that Park Service regulations are designed to preserve.

Whereas Oberwetter and her friends visited the Jefferson near midnight, Saturday’s protest was staged during the day, on Memorial Day weekend, in order to draw maximum attention. The organizers issued a public call for photographers and videographers to document the event, and the inevitable arrests (watch below).

According to Dcist, the dancers were charged with demonstrating without a permit and released.”

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Intelligence means that we have a responsibility to tell it like it is, and this was not as simple as people being arrested for dancing. You can say it was simply a matter of people being arrested for dancing, but that doesn’t make it so.

These people were arrested for protesting after an appeals court ruled that dancing in the memorial is illegal. One of the protesters wore a “Disobey” t-shirt. The protester who was placed in a chokehold tried to foricbly pull a companion protester away from the officer who was detaining him.

You can say, They were arresting for dancing, a thousand times, and it won’t make the statement true. They were arrested for protesting. They put out a call to the media prior to going to the memorial, because they wanted to make a statement. Security personnel were notified in advance of their arrival. This, too, was part of their plan. The police were probably a bit irritated at being drawn into this, but they were doing a job and they weren’t given a choice in respect to this matter. They were doing the job they were trained and instructed to do.

The Internet is a bit like the gossip game where people sit in a circle. A statement is made by one person and then it is passed through the group until it reaches the last ear. The statement is never repeated verbatim, because people hear what they want to hear and they adapt the story when passing it along.

So with the Internet it’s relatively easy to turn a complex social issue into a pat statement. PEOPLE ARE ARRESTED FOR DANCING AT THE JEFFERSON MEMORIAL! People will hear what they want to hear and they won’t take the time to verify the veracity of a story.

It is what it is. Don’t make it out to be simple for the sake of convenience because then the bad guys win. I’m not saying the protesters were wrong. I’m not saying the cops were wrong. I’m saying that this is not as simple as people being arrested for dancing, so tell it like it is.

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Kevin (536) (@placid) 8 years, 9 months ago ago

@w0manp0et, I’m pretty sure they were arrested for dancing. You say ‘protest’ but their means of protest was dancing. Therefore, they were arrested for dancing.

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Sara111 (49) (@sarad) 8 years, 9 months ago ago

@w0manp0et, Why would you even try to defend it? Dancing, protesting… I don’t care what they were doing they have the RIGHT to do it NO matter what “law” or “authority” says. If we do not resist and stick up for our simple rights such as dancing, protesting, free speech then we will be trampled on. We the people are not the criminals, the ones making us out to be ARE the real criminals.

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~WP~ (4) (@w0manp0et) 8 years, 9 months ago ago

@placid,

They don’t have the right to do it Kevin. They absolutely do not have the right to dance at the memorial. The court handed down a ruling: This activity is not allowed at the memorial.

What you have here is a group of very rich, very bored individuals (some may be exceptions, bur I can assure you that the majority of these people are very rich and very bored) who need to create drama in their lives. They don’t have real problems, so they create problems to entertain themselves. This isn’t about social injustice blah blah blah. It’s about a group of immature people stirring the pot to entertain themselves.

There’s nothing wrong with dancing. Dance to your hearts’ content, but do it in appropriate settings. The Jefferson Memorial is not the appropriate place for dancing, and the people who say that Jefferson’s turning in his grave are ridiculous. Jefferson would be among those who disagree with the protestors. There’s a place and a time for everything, and every place and any time is not appropriate for every action.

We make rules because individuals in society force us to make rules. It’s as simple as that. When we don’t make rules, people like these protesters force our hand. With all the problems in this country, do you think the courts want to waste their precious time handing down rulings about dancing in federal memorials? Of course not. So, why did the court hand down this ruling? Their hand was forced by “Mary Brooke Oberwetter and a group of friends.” These lovely ladies were probably not the first people to dance in the memorial. They were a group of rich, bored young ladies who’d done it all–well, nearly. What they hadn’t done was achieve notoriety. Their names weren’t destined to go into the annals of history. How to remedy that? A midnight dance at the Jefferson Memorial.

Bingo!

There’s nothing wrong with dancing. Why can’t people dance at the memorial? There’s nothing wrong with picnicking; it’s an American tradition. Bring your checkered tablecloths and lay your spread out at the feet of Thomas Jefferson! There’s nothing wrong with a lot if things, so let your hair down and go for it!

We make rules, as a society, because people force us to make rules. When the rules have been made, we must follow them, as a society. If we don’t like the rules they can be changed, but it takes time and effort. Dancing at the memorial because you don’t like the court’s ruling is no the way to change this rule.

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Sara111 (49) (@sarad) 8 years, 9 months ago ago

@w0manp0et, “We make rules, as a society, because people force us to make rules. When the rules have been made, we must follow them, as a society. If we don’t like the rules they can be changed, but it takes time and effort. Dancing at the memorial because you don’t like the court’s ruling is no the way to change this rule.” – Society does not make the laws if they did we wouldn’t have a no dancing law. When rules have been made that violate our rights then yes resistance is the answer. Example…. There was once a law that blacks could not sit at the front of the bus, if not for resisting and doing it anyway how would that law be changed? If not for the uprising of the people we will continue to be bombarded with ridiculous laws.

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TravisAD (53) (@travisad) 8 years, 9 months ago ago

@w0manp0et, I respectfully disagree.

There should be no reason why someone should be arrested for slow dancing or dancing in a fashion that doesn’t get in the way of anyone else. If someone went there and tried to lay out cardboard and break dance, that would be another story.

Why, might you ask? Well let’s break it down for you.

Slow dancing takes up about the same amount of space as it would if you were just standing there. Break dancing requires more space, can potentially harm themselves or someone else, can potentially cause un-needed stress on anything within the memorial (i.e. someone messes up a move and smacks their head into Jefferson’s…. knee).

Don’t get me wrong. It looks as though it was a power struggle, those who felt they shouldn’t have had to stop dancing and the cop who couldn’t get these civilians to listen to him.

I can understand where you say there is a time and a place, but really why shouldn’t one be allowed to dance? Especially if it isn’t harming anyone else? Anyone who would arrest someone for such an act is a deprived, beat down, soul; IMHO.

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